didascalic

didascalic

(ˌdɪdəˈskælɪk)
adj
(Education) of or relating to instruction or teaching
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Pertaining to a long didascalic tradition, two of these events, i.e.
Considering first theory and practice,then amphitheaters and texts, he discusses scene individable, or poem unlimited: premodern theories of the dramatic mode; the narrative economy of social commerce; cleaving the general ear; and didascalic space in early modern printed drama.
The most important of these are the didascalic treatises of Cassiodorus, Isidore, and Hugh of St.
Melancthon also added a fourth genre to the three traditional types of discourse: the didascalic genre which aimed at teaching.
Punctually, in its briefest manifestations, the narrative voice adopts an obvious didascalic mode.
On the fringes of the didascalic function, banal motifs serve character and place identification (JR's hanky, phone, pencil stub, portfolio and sneaker; diCephalis' blade slipped under the ice cube tray; Hyde's worsted and tweed; Amy's bag, hanky and glasses; Davidoff's cuffs and cufflinks; Gibbs' cigarettes; billboards and inscriptions of all kinds, etc.).
Here is Nixon's Loeb translation, with his familiarizing didascalic parentheses for the reader's theatre of the mind: Ples.
In Sud, "Personnages" has an important, if subtle didascalic function; it lists the characters not in order of their appearance, but first by their sex, and then by their importance in the play.
The didascalic notation in this passage, "(Elle rit doucement)," punctuates Mrs.
Aristotle divided dialectic discussion into four forms, called didascalic, dialectic, peirastic, and sophistic.
In didascalic dialectic, the respondent shows by making a false statement that he is ignorant of some truth.