Die Brücke

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Related to Die Brucke: expressionism, fauvism

Die Brücke

(The Bridge) (c. 1905–13) A group of German expressionists, including Kirchner, whose manifesto was to overthrow the concept of art as an end in itself, and to integrate art and life by using art as a means of communication. Influenced by tribal art and van Gogh, the founders lived and worked communally, using clashing colors and aggressive distortions in their intense works.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He became aware of modern French art and of two avant-garde German Expressionist groups, Die Brucke and Der Blaue Reiter, but seems to have learnt more at this stage from Van Gogh.
As waves of new, modernist movements broke in the early twentieth century--Fauvisme, Cubism, Die Brucke, Futurism, Vorticism--Impressionism was no longer avant-garde.
We are reminded of the birth of Expressionism with the group of painters known as Die Brucke as well as some of Ernst Ludwig Kirchners nudes.
The German expressionist group organized in 1905 in Dresden, called Die Brucke (The bridge), develops a pictorial poetics equivalent to the fauvist one (to which it is contemporary and has close ties), based on the mental and physiological force of the act of creation, the recording of the psychic wave, of the spontaneous emotion, of the artist's temperament.
In diesem Jahr erschienen auch seine ersten Gcdichtubersetzungen in deutscher Sprache in der Czcrnowitzer Zeitschrift Die Brucke. 1924 und 1925 wohnte er in Lugosch und war Redakteur der Zeitungen Vointa und Patria, Direktoriumsmitglied der Zeitschrift Cultura und standiger Mitarbeiter der Zeitschriften Gandirea, Adevarul literar si artistic und Cuvantul.
The German expressionist group Die Brucke and the Vienna Secession painters are some of the references that come to mind when looking at these works, rather than typical line art-based comics.
Vincent Pecora's introduction to "The Woolf Era" contains so much information that it often reads like an encyclopedia article in hyperdrive; one page, for example, goes from "Die Brucke" to Dada to Freud, to Bataille, to Boas and Durkheim in the space of two sentences.
Members of groups such as Die Brucke and the Blauer Reiter were initially influenced by the French Fauves movement, and their Russian contemporaries also tried to find new artistic truth in Paris, 'la Ville Lumiere'.
The works themselves conjure the visual vocabularies of a slew of art-historical movements well versed in extremity--from Die Brucke and Surrealism to art brut--evincing the artist's penchant for exploring the fine line between illegible chaos and precarious order.