dietary supplement

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dietary supplement

n.
A product containing one or more vitamins, herbs, enzymes, amino acids, or other ingredients, that is taken orally to supplement one's diet, as by providing a missing nutrient.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dietary supplement - something added to complete a diet or to make up for a dietary deficiency
diet - a prescribed selection of foods
vitamin pill - a pill containing one or more vitamins; taken as a dietary supplement
References in periodicals archive ?
However, distributors and companies producing liquid dietary supplements have to meet the terms of Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) and rules set by the Food and Drug Administration.
(And they'd be unlawful, unapproved new drugs to boot.) Along comes the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act in '94, which declared supplements to be foods-therefore, just like other foods, not required (in most cases) to get pre-approval from FDA-and explicitly made clear that the products had permission to make claims for their effects on the structure or function of the body.
Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, producers of dietary supplements are held to standards for the manufacture and labeling of their products, which the FDA is looking to make stricter.
In 1994, Congress passed the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) in hopes of defining and regulating dietary supplements.
Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), the manufacturer or distributor must notify FDA at least 75 days before beginning to market a dietary supplement that contains a new dietary ingredient (one that was not marketed in the U.S.
Not many dietary supplements can claim that they were instrumental in the passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA).
The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994 provides a statutory definition of the difference between a dietary supplement and a prescription drug.
Houston, TX, July 14, 2012 --(PR.com)-- The FDA, with assistance from the FTC, has become increasingly aware of the large amount of dietary supplements that have come onto the market since the passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act in 1994.
Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994, it's up to the manufacturer or distributer to ensure the safety of supplements.
Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA), dietary supplement manufacturers (and brand owners) are responsible for ensuring a dietary supplement is safe before it is marketed, FDA explains.
In response to a growing concern for greater regulation of the dietary supplement industry, Congress should pass new legislation, such as the proposed Dietary Supplement Safety Act of 2010, (10) which would repeal the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act. Further, it should adopt a new system that mimics that of the European Union's Food Supplements Directive and Canada's Natural Health Products Regulations.