protein

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Related to Dietary protein: protein deficiency

protein

plants or animal compounds rich in amino acids required for growth and repair of animal tissue
Not to be confused with:
protean – extremely variable; changeable in shape or form, as an amoeba; a versatile actor

pro·tein

 (prō′tēn′, -tē-ĭn)
n.
Any of a group of complex organic macromolecules that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually sulfur and are composed of one or more chains of amino acids. Proteins are fundamental components of all living cells and include many substances, such as enzymes, hormones, and antibodies, that are necessary for the proper functioning of an organism. They are essential in the diet of animals for the growth and repair of tissue and can be obtained from foods such as meat, fish, eggs, milk, and legumes.

[French protéine, from Late Greek prōteios, of the first quality, from Greek prōtos, first; see per in Indo-European roots.]

pro′tein·a′ceous (prōt′n-ā′shəs, prō′tē-nā′-), pro·tein′ic (prō-tē′nĭk), pro·tein′ous (prō-tē′nəs) adj.

protein

(ˈprəʊtiːn)
n
(Biochemistry) any of a large group of nitrogenous compounds of high molecular weight that are essential constituents of all living organisms. They consist of one or more chains of amino acids linked by peptide bonds and are folded into a specific three-dimensional shape maintained by further chemical bonding
[C19: via German from Greek prōteios primary, from protos first + -in]
ˌproteinˈaceous, proˈteinic, proˈteinous adj

pro•tein

(ˈproʊ tin, -ti ɪn)

n.
1. any of numerous organic molecules constituting a large portion of the mass of every life form, composed of 20 or more amino acids linked in one or more long chains, the final shape and other properties of each protein being determined by the side chains of the amino acids and their chemical attachments.
2. plant or animal tissue rich in such molecules, considered as a food source.
[< French protéine (1838) < Greek prōte(îos) primary + French -ine -in1]
pro`tein•a′ceous (-tiˈneɪ ʃəs, -ti ɪˈneɪ-) adj.

pro·tein

(prō′tēn′)
One of a large class of complex organic chemical compounds that are essential for life. Proteins play a central role in biological processes and form the basis of living tissues. They consist of long, looping or folding chains of smaller compounds called amino acids. Enzymes, antibodies, and hemoglobin are examples of proteins.

protein

  • albumen, albumin - Albumen is the white of an egg, from Latin albus, "white"; albumin is a protein within the albumen.
  • protein - Pronounced PRO-teen or PRO-tee-un, it comes from Greek proteios, "primary," as these compounds are essential to all living organisms.
  • protoplasm - A mixture of organic and inorganic substances, such as protein and water, it is regarded as the physical basis of life.
  • textured vegetable protein - A protein obtained from soy beans and made to resemble minced meat.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.protein - any of a large group of nitrogenous organic compounds that are essential constituents of living cellsprotein - any of a large group of nitrogenous organic compounds that are essential constituents of living cells; consist of polymers of amino acids; essential in the diet of animals for growth and for repair of tissues; can be obtained from meat and eggs and milk and legumes; "a diet high in protein"
capsid - the outer covering of protein surrounding the nucleic acid of a virus
gluten - a protein substance that remains when starch is removed from cereal grains; gives cohesiveness to dough
meat - the flesh of animals (including fishes and birds and snails) used as food
legume - the seedpod of a leguminous plant (such as peas or beans or lentils)
eggs, egg - oval reproductive body of a fowl (especially a hen) used as food
milk - a white nutritious liquid secreted by mammals and used as food by human beings
amino acid, aminoalkanoic acid - organic compounds containing an amino group and a carboxylic acid group; "proteins are composed of various proportions of about 20 common amino acids"
recombinant protein - a protein derived from recombinant DNA
actomyosin - a protein complex in muscle fibers; composed of myosin and actin; shortens when stimulated and causes muscle contractions
aleurone - granular protein in outermost layer of endosperm of many seeds or cereal grains
amyloid - (pathology) a waxy translucent complex protein resembling starch that results from degeneration of tissue
apoenzyme - a protein that combines with a coenzyme to form an active enzyme
compound protein, conjugated protein - a protein complex combining amino acids with other substances
enzyme - any of several complex proteins that are produced by cells and act as catalysts in specific biochemical reactions
fibrin - a white insoluble fibrous protein formed by the action of thrombin on fibrinogen when blood clots; it forms a network that traps red cells and platelets
filaggrin - the main protein of the keratohyalin granules; "the specific target of the immune response in rheumatoid arthritis is filaggrin"
growth factor - a protein that is involved in cell differentiation and growth
haptoglobin - a protein in plasma that binds free hemoglobin and removes it (as from wounds)
iodinated protein, iodoprotein - a protein that contains iodine
nucleoprotein - any of several substances found in the nuclei of all living cells; consists of a protein bound to a nucleic acid
opsin - retinal protein formed by the action of light on rhodopsin
phosphoprotein - containing chemically bound phosphoric acid
plasma protein - any of the proteins in blood plasma
prostate specific antigen, PSA - a protein manufactured exclusively by the prostate gland; PSA is produced for the ejaculate where it liquifies the semen and allows sperm cells to swim freely; elevated levels of PSA in blood serum are associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer
proteome - the full complement of proteins produced by a particular genome
simple protein - a protein that yields only amino acids when hydrolyzed
polypeptide - a peptide containing 10 to more than 100 amino acids
cytokine - any of various protein molecules secreted by cells of the immune system that serve to regulate the immune system
ferritin - a protein containing 20% iron that is found in the intestines and liver and spleen; it is one of the chief forms in which iron is stored in the body
macromolecule, supermolecule - any very large complex molecule; found only in plants and animals
antibody - any of a large variety of proteins normally present in the body or produced in response to an antigen which it neutralizes, thus producing an immune response

protein

Proteins

actin, actomyosin, aleurone, alpha-fetoprotein, amyloid, apoprotein, avidin, calmodulin, caseinogen, conchiolin, dystrophin, factor VIII, ferritin, fibrin, fibrinogen, fibroin, flagellin, gliadin, globin, gluten, hordein, keratin, lactalbumin, lactoprotein, lectin, legumin, leptin, lymphokine, myosin, opsin, ossein, prion, properdin, ricin, sclerotin, sericin, spongin, thrombogen, vitellin, zein
Translations
bílkovina
protein
proteiinivalkuaisaine
bjelančevinaprotein
fehérje
prótín, hvíta
蛋白質
단백질
baltymasproteinas
proteīns, olbaltums
bielkovina
proteinäggviteämne
โปรตีน
chất đạm

protein

[ˈprəʊtiːn]
A. Nproteína f
B. CPD protein content Ncontenido m proteínico

protein

[ˈprəʊtiːn] nprotéine fprotein content nteneur f en protéinesprotein deficiency ncarence f en protéines

protein

nEiweiß nt, → Protein nt; a high-protein dieteine eiweißreiche or stark proteinhaltige Kost

protein

[ˈprəʊtiːn] nproteina

protein

(ˈprəutiːn) noun
any of a large number of substances present in milk, eggs, meat etc, which are necessary as part of the food of human beings and animals.

protein

بْرُوتِيـن bílkovina protein Protein πρωτεΐνη proteína proteiini protéine protein proteina 蛋白質 단백질 proteïne protein białko proteína белок protein โปรตีน protein chất đạm 蛋白质

pro·tein

n. proteína, complejo compuesto nitrogenado esencial en el desarrollo y preservación de los tejidos del cuerpo;
___ balancebalance de las ___ -s;
___ concentration___ concentración de ___.

protein

adj proteico (form); n proteína (frec. pl); — supplement suplemento proteico, suplemento de proteína(s)
References in periodicals archive ?
Cats' dietary protein requirement is 20 g/kg DM or 5 g/100 kcals, twice as much as dogs.
Lean red meat is a good source of dietary protein and when eaten in moderation, can form part of a healthy diet.
It comes into view that the lowest frequency could provide dietary protein at or slightly above the maintenance level of the fish as recommended by Hung and Lutes (1987), Mehboob et al.
Phe accumulation in the blood and brain can lead to neurocognitive abnormalities and treatment currently requires severe dietary protein restriction.
One technique is to increase dietary protein to promote satiety (feeling of contentment after eating) and to slow the increase in blood glucose that occurs after a meal.
8g/dl, serum cholesterol < 120mg/dl, BMI < 23 kg/m2 (dry weight), total body fat less than 10%, dietary protein intake (DPI) < 0.
These low-carb products provide a supplemental source of dietary protein for vegetarians as well as vegans who cannot metabolize animal protein.
Eighteen countries, including India, may lose more than 5 per cent of their dietary protein by 2050 as a result of crops such as rice, wheat and barley losing their nutritional value.
Determining the optimum dietary protein for fish enables the formulation of diets that maximize protein retention and reduce nitrogen excretion, thus reducing the costs and environmental impacts of aquaculture (CYRINO et al.
Dietary protein from any food source--plant or animal--can improve muscle mass and strength, researchers say.
The increased ratios of dietary protein remarkably improved the rate of rear teat length growth (p<0.
Thus an optimum dietary protein level in the diet is important for fish growth and maintenance of good farming environments [15].

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