Paiute

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Related to Digger Indians: Helen Hunt Jackson, Northern Paiutes

Pai·ute

also Pi·ute  (pī′yo͞ot′)
n. pl. Paiute or Pai·utes also Piute or Pi·utes
1. A member of a Native American people inhabiting eastern Oregon, western Nevada, and adjacent areas of northeast California. Also called Northern Paiute.
2. A member of a Native American people inhabiting southern Utah and Nevada, northern Arizona, and adjacent areas of southeast California. Also called Southern Paiute.

Pai′ute′ adj.

Paiute

(ˈpaɪˌuːt; paɪˈjuːt) or

Piute

npl -utes or -ute
1. (Peoples) a member of either of two North American Indian peoples (Northern Paiute and Southern Paiute) of the Southwestern US, related to the Aztecs
2. (Languages) the language of either of these peoples, belonging to the Shoshonean subfamily of the Uto-Aztecan family

Pai•ute

(paɪˈut, ˈpaɪ ut)

n., pl. -utes, (esp. collectively) -ute.
1. a member of an American Indian people of the U.S. Great Basin region.
2. either of two Uto-Aztecan languages spoken by the Paiutes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Paiute - a member of either of two Shoshonean peoples (northern Paiute and southern Paiute) related to the Aztecs and living in the southwestern United StatesPaiute - a member of either of two Shoshonean peoples (northern Paiute and southern Paiute) related to the Aztecs and living in the southwestern United States
Shoshone, Shoshoni - a member of the North American Indian people (related to the Aztecs) of the southwestern United States
2.Paiute - the Shoshonean language spoken by the Paiute
Shoshonean, Shoshonean language, Shoshonian, Shoshonian language - a subfamily of Uto-Aztecan languages spoken mainly in the southwestern United States
References in classic literature ?
The aborigines of the Andaman Islands may perhaps claim the distinction of being the smallest race upon this earth, though some anthropologists prefer the Bushmen of Africa, the Digger Indians of America, and the Terra del Fuegians.
In that little gem we hear Colonel Henry Fonda complain to Captain John Wayne that they have little chance for "glory or advancement," because while some of their fellow officers are "leading their well-publicized campaigns against the great Indian nations the Sioux and the Cheyenne-we are asked to ward off the gnat stings and flea bites of a few cowardly digger Indians.
They fell into two groups: those toward the east were nomadic horsemen, skilled as warriors and buffalo hunters; farther west were those who sometimes were called Digger Indians, plant cultivators living in brush shelters.