mydriasis

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my·dri·a·sis

 (mĭ-drī′ə-sĭs)
n.
Dilation of the pupil of the eye, especially when excessive or prolonged, usually as a result of trauma, a medical disorder, or a drug.

[Latin mydriāsis, from Greek mudriāsis, perhaps from mudros, red-hot mass of metal in a forge (in reference to the more brilliant appearance of the dilated pupil to ancient physicians, as a result of light reflected off the fundus of the eye ); possibly akin to mudān, to be damp, dripping ( mudros perhaps originally referring to molten iron).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mydriasis

(mɪˈdraɪəsɪs; maɪ-)
n
(Pathology) abnormal dilation of the pupil of the eye, produced by drugs, coma, etc
[C17: via Late Latin from Greek; origin obscure]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

my•dri•a•sis

(mɪˈdraɪ ə sɪs, maɪ-)

n.
excessive dilatation of the pupil of the eye, as the result of disease, drugs, or the like. Compare miosis.
[1650–60; < Latin mydriāsis < Greek mydríāsis, appar. derivative of mýdros hot mass of iron, though sense connection unclear]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mydriasis

abnormal dilatation of the pupil, the result of disease or the use of certain drugs. Cf. miosis. — mydriatic, adj.
See also: Eyes
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mydriasis - reflex pupillary dilation as a muscle pulls the iris outward; occurs in response to a decrease in light or certain drugs
dilatation, dilation - the act of expanding an aperture; "the dilation of the pupil of the eye"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

my·dri·a·sis

n. midriasis, dilatación prolongada de la pupila.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Although the young man was brave, as we know, he was terrified at that wild countenance, those terribly dilated pupils, those pale cheeks, and those bleeding lips.
On each of these occasions Mrs Verloc's dilated pupils, losing their far-off fixity, followed her husband's movements with the effect of black care and, impenetrable attention.
Her eyes raised for a moment seemed full of innocent suffering and unexpressed menace in the depths of the dilated pupils within the rings of sombre blue.
A thorough examination by an ophthalmologist is required after identification and documentation of inflicted ocular trauma; the examination should include indirect ophthalmoscopy, most optimally through a dilated pupil, especially for assessment of possible RHs.
The most common side effects observed following topical application of Qbrexza to the underarms were dry mouth, dilated pupil, sore throat, headache, urinary hesitation, blurred vision, dry nose, dry throat, dry eye, dry skin and constipation.
With the cloudy cornea and dilated pupil, I put my bet on acute close-angle glaucoma.'
I have always felt apprehensive about cycloplegic retinoscopy because I rarely feel confident with the end point retinoscopy result that I obtain on a dilated pupil. Recently, during my time in the HES paediatric clinic, I had the opportunity to practice this skill on each patient and compare my prescription to that of the optometrist I was observing.
classified patients into two groups using a preoperative dilated pupil diameter of 6.5 mm and found that those with a diameter <6.5 mm had a significantly higher incidence of IFIS [13].
Their clinical measurements of pharmacologically dilated pupil size before surgery found significantly smaller pupils in patients who had used tamsulosin than in control patients, in contrast to the findings in a study by Cooney et al.
Early diagnosis was challenging due to a history of head trauma and a unilateral dilated pupil. Since both neurological and cardiological causes were plausible, the patient was conveyed to a centre with specialist expertise in both, rather than the nearest hospital.
She has a past history of substance use and misuse starting at the age of eleven years, smoking cannabis and hashish; at that age she developed an abnormally and continuously dilated pupil (Figure 1) leaving a thin rim of blue iridial tissue; the condition is affecting both eyes (bilaterally) though both pupils still react to light, including sunlight (i.e., pupillary light reflex is intact).