diminutive

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di·min·u·tive

 (dĭ-mĭn′yə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Extremely or extraordinarily small. See Synonyms at small.
2. Grammar Of or being a suffix that indicates smallness or, by semantic extension, qualities such as youth, familiarity, affection, or contempt, as -let in booklet, -kin in lambkin, or -et in nymphet.
n.
1. Grammar A diminutive suffix, word, or name.
2. A very small person or thing.

[Middle English diminutif, from Old French, from Latin dīminūtīvus, from dīminūtus, past participle of dīminuere; see diminish.]

di·min′u·tive·ly adv.
di·min′u·tive·ness n.

diminutive

(dɪˈmɪnjʊtɪv)
adj
1. very small; tiny
2. (Linguistics) grammar
a. denoting an affix added to a word to convey the meaning small or unimportant or to express affection, as for example the suffix -ette in French
b. denoting a word formed by the addition of a diminutive affix
n
3. (Grammar) grammar a diminutive word or affix
4. a tiny person or thing
Compare (for senses 2, 3): augmentative
diminutival adj
diˈminutively adv
diˈminutiveness n

di•min•u•tive

(dɪˈmɪn yə tɪv)

adj.
1. much smaller than the average or usual; tiny.
2. pertaining to or productive of a form denoting smallness, familiarity, affection, or triviality, as the suffix -let in droplet from drop.
n.
3. a diminutive element or formation.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin dīminūtīvus= Latin dīminūt(us) lessened (for dēminūtus; see diminution) + -īvus -ive]
di•min′u•tive•ly, adv.
di•min′u•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diminutive - a word that is formed with a suffix (such as -let or -kin) to indicate smallness
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
Adj.1.diminutive - very smalldiminutive - very small; "diminutive in stature"; "a lilliputian chest of drawers"; "her petite figure"; "tiny feet"; "the flyspeck nation of Bahrain moved toward democracy"
little, small - limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a little dining room"; "a little house"; "a small car"; "a little (or small) group"

diminutive

adjective small, little, tiny, minute, pocket(-sized), mini, wee, miniature, petite, midget, undersized, teeny-weeny, Lilliputian, bantam, teensy-weensy, pygmy or pigmy a diminutive figure stood at the entrance
big, great, giant, massive (informal), enormous, immense, jumbo (informal), gigantic, colossal, king-size

diminutive

adjective
Translations
شَديد الصِّغَر
drobnýmaličkýzdrobnělina
diminutivmeget lille
diminutiivimitätönpienentääpikkuruinenvähäinen
deminutivumanjenica
pöttöm
agnarlítill, örsmár
diminutiefkleinverkleinendverkleinwoord
drobnýmaličkýzdrobnenina

diminutive

[dɪˈmɪnjʊtɪv]
A. ADJ
1. (= very small) → diminuto
2. (Ling) → diminutivo
B. N (Ling) → diminutivo m

diminutive

[dɪˈmɪnjʊtɪv]
adj (= very small) → minuscule, tout(e) petit(e)
n (= shortened form) [word, name] → diminutif m

diminutive

adjwinzig, klein; (Gram) → diminutiv
n (Gram) → Verkleinerungsform f, → Diminutiv(um) nt; (of name)Kurzform f

diminutive

[dɪˈmɪnjʊtɪv]
1. adj (frm) → minuto/a, minuscolo/a
2. n (Gram) → diminutivo

diminution

(dimiˈnjuːʃən) noun
lessening. a diminution in the birth rate.
diminutive (diˈminjutiv) adjective
very small. a diminutive child.

diminutive

n. diminutivo;
a. diminuto-a, pequeño-a.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the use of ma/mhe was extended further to inanimate nouns, and in this case, and in this case it has given rise to a fully productive diminutive suffix denoting 'a small X', as the examples in (7 c) show.
The name combines "neutral," indicating that it is neutral - carrying no electric charge - and "-ino," an Italian diminutive suffix. Although it is one of the most fundamental of particles, its properties are still not yet fully understood.
Secondly, it is the only diminutive suffix that forms perfective diminutive verbs and as such has diminutive properties different from other verbs in our inventory, e.g.
As an example of child-centred speech situations, Bulloch (1921/1970: 140) presents the following lines, in which the sequence of diminutives is quite remarkable, as almost every noun has a diminutive suffix (emphasis added here and elsewhere):
It is difficult to see, for example, how the meaning 'muscle' of Latin musculus, a shape-based metaphorical extension of the primary meaning 'little mouse' (from mus 'mouse'), could be divided into the features 'mouse' + 'X,' such that 'X' could come to be associated with the diminutive suffix -culus and so eventually give rise to a new meaning of this suffix.
One of the etymological mysteries of contemporary English historical linguistics is the origin of the diminutive suffix -y, -ie, which first appeared during the Middle English Period.
(Is one to make anything of the grammatical peculiarity of German where nouns with a diminutive suffix are always neuter?) How did Ea von Allesch respond to this anti-emancipatory infantilizing?
Although the common diminutive form of amba is ambakan, which is formed by adding the suffix -kan ([is similar to] -ken [is similar to] -kon), ambasa is also a diminutive form of amba, albeit a form which appears only to occur in the expression ambasa moo 'rather large tree'.(53) However, the occurrence of ambasa in Jurchen with the meaning 'great, large' suggests that the adjective ambasa may not have originally been as limited in usage as it appears to be in Manchu.(54) I propose that the use of the adjective ambasa to modify saisa is a conscious attempt to convey the meaning of the Chinese diminutive suffix zi.
The most common view sees Godot as God with the "-ot" as a diminutive suffix. The French title En Attendant Godot seems to lend support to this interpretation.
For female diminutives, the most complete paradigm is undoubtedly formed with the diminutive suffix '-ka/-icka', because each of the analysed female nouns forms its diminutive form by means of this suffix.
It appears instead to be the familiar diminutive suffix -ie of many Scottish pet names (Jeanie, Lowrie) and common nouns (laddie, lassie).