Dinka

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Related to Dinkas: Dinka religion

Din·ka

 (dĭng′kə)
n. pl. Dinka or Din·kas
1. A member of a traditionally pastoral people of the Nile valley in South Sudan.
2. The Nilotic language of this people.

[Probably ultimately from Dinka jieng, person.]

Dinka

(ˈdɪŋkə)
npl -kas or -ka
1. (Peoples) a member of a Nilotic people of South Sudan, noted for their height, which often reaches seven feet tall: chiefly herdsmen
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Nilotic group of the Nilo-Saharan family
[from Dinka jieng people]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dinka - a Nilotic language
Nilotic, Nilotic language - a group of languages of East Africa belonging to the Chari-Nile group
References in periodicals archive ?
Riek Machar was telling us [defectors] on the ground that the fighting is between Nuer and Dinka while in Addis Ababa he is appointing Dinkas to key, top positions of rebels," said Jok.
However (as the Dinka already know), "Dinka divinities do not have much power over Arabs, Europeans, or educated Dinkas.
Dinkas have a thirst for learning, and he was such a diligent student that when he later enrolled at Tacoma's Henry Foss High School he was able to step right into the 11th grade and handle a schedule that includes geometry, biology, literature, computer training, and world geography.
The food shortage is evident in northern Bahr el Ghazal where SPLA supporters are under attack from three sides - Nuers from the east, Arab militias from the north, and Dinkas aligned with the government from the southwest.
Kuon who was appointed last month by the rebel leader Riek Machar to represent the movement at the UN General Assembly on Friday said only Dinkas received president Kiir in Washington DC during his recent visit for a US-Africa Leaders' Summit.
By Tesfa-Alem Tekle July 15, 2014 (ADDIS ABABA) -- A senior official from South Sudan's SPLM/A in Opposition has accused president Salva Kiir of calling for a tribal war between Dinkas and Nuers.
He claims that he was summoned by God for divinity and had returned to take Dinkas to a happy land where there are no governments.
Among the Dinka clans, the Dinkas of Unity and Upper Nile states have been severely marginalized and are not represented at all in the ambassadorial positions.
However, the story surrounding the contentions over land issue in Juba is more complicated than the simple line that a certain tribe in South Sudan, particularly, the Dinkas are grabbing the lands of the local Bari people.
He also wanted his handpicked clan officers to tell what he wanted the public to hear and to see Dinkas as liberators of others.
Aside from the thousand Dinka killed in the main incident there were also reports of slavery of Dinka women and children in the Kordofan-Bahr al Ghazal borderlands.
Building largely on oral literature from the Dinka in southern Sudan, this paper aims to explore the gap between objective poverty and the subjective perception of wealth.