Dio Cassius


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Dio Cassius

(ˈdaɪəʊ ˈkæsɪəs)
n
(Biography) ?155–?230 ad, Roman historian. His History of Rome covers the period of Rome's transition from Republic to Empire
References in periodicals archive ?
She was a woman of surpassing beauty, and at that time, when she was in the prime of her youth, she was most striking," wrote Roman statesman Dio Cassius, while Plutarch spoke of "a woman who was haughty and astonishingly proud in the matter of beauty".
They discuss elite movement, namely the escorted movements of Roman aristocrats, the physical appearance of foreign embassies, the movements of the empress Livia Drusilla, the Republican public movement of the elite and descriptions by imperial authors like Dio Cassius and Herodian, and the immobility and potential movements of aristocratic, Christian virgins, then movement in ancient literature, including the use of movement by Roman and Greek historians to explain and construct moral lessons from violent events, Horace's Satirae 1.
The historical narrative is well supported by literary and archeological evidence, including quotes from the histories of Tacitus and Dio Cassius, the geography of Strabo, and the biography of Suetonius, as well as letters uncovered at Vindolanda.
Caracalla, the Roman historian Dio Cassius tells us, was probably history's most extreme cat lover: his pet lion Acinaces shared the emperor's table, and even his bed.
Though by this time suffering agonies from gout, or perhaps arthritis, he led an invasion of Caledonia (Scotland), whose inhabitants, according to the contemporary historian Dio Cassius, lived naked in tents and had their women in common.
provided by Dio Cassius, Herodian, and the author of the Historia Augusta.
Ancient Roman historian Dio Cassius, one of the few sources we have on the second rebellion, states that the Jewish uprising against Rome was ignited by the provocative plan of Hadrian, the Roman emperor, to raise a temple to Jupiter in Jerusalem on the Temple Mount and convert the former Jewish capital into a Roman colony.
The ancient Roman historian Dio Cassius described the death of Antinous in his Roman History as a voluntary sacrifice on behalf of Hadrian.
The Emperor then was Antoninus Pius (138-161), described by the third-century pagan historian Dio Cassius as "showing the Christians great respect.
The Batavian horsemen and all the Batavians excelled from ancient times among the tribes of Germania Inferior in horsemanship, as appears from Plutarch, Tacitus, Dio Cassius, and other authors.