Diogenes


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Di·og·e·nes

 (dī-ŏj′ə-nēz′) Died c. 320 bc.
Greek philosopher and founder of the Cynic school who advocated self-control and the pursuit of virtue through simple living. He is said to have once wandered through the streets of Athens with a lantern in daylight, searching for an honest man.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Diogenes

(daɪˈɒdʒɪˌniːz)
n
(Biography) ?412–?323 bc, Greek Cynic philosopher, who rejected social conventions and advocated self-sufficiency and simplicity of life
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Di•og•e•nes

(daɪˈɒdʒ əˌniz)

n.
412?–323 B.C., Greek Cynic philosopher.
Di`o•gen′ic (-əˈdʒɛn ɪk) Di•og`e•ne′an, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Diogenes - an ancient Greek philosopher and Cynic who rejected social conventions (circa 400-325 BC)Diogenes - an ancient Greek philosopher and Cynic who rejected social conventions (circa 400-325 BC)
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Translations
Diogenes
Diogenész
Diogenes
Diogenes
References in classic literature ?
"The Diogenes Club is the queerest club in London, and Mycroft one of the queerest men.
Her eyes paused and dwelt upon a yellow cluster of Diogenes' lanterns that grew on the edge of an open space.
Hammerdown will sell by the orders of Diogenes' assignees, or will be instructed by the executors, to offer to public competition, the library, furniture, plate, wardrobe, and choice cellar of wines of Epicurus deceased.
What were sunsets to us, who were about to live and breathe and walk in actual Athens; yea, and go far down into the dead centuries and bid in person for the slaves, Diogenes and Plato, in the public market-place, or gossip with the neighbors about the siege of Troy or the splendid deeds of Marathon?
Civilization has not yet arrived at the point where one can go stark naked, as ancient Diogenes wished.
His views of human nature were the views of Diogenes, tempered by Rochefoucauld; his personal habits were slovenly in the last degree; and his favorite boast was that he had outlived all human prejudices.
Phocion, Socrates, Anaxagoras, Diogenes, are great men, but they leave no class.
(Cheers.) Every gentleman who hears me, is probably acquainted with the reply made by an individual, who --to use an ordinary figure of speech--"hung out" in a tub, to the emperor Alexander:--"if I were not Diogenes," said he, "I would be Alexander." I can well imagine these gentlemen to say, "If I were not Dumkins I would be Luffey; if I were not Podder I would be Struggles." (Enthusiasm.) But, gentlemen of Muggleton, is it in cricket alone that your fellow-townsmen stand pre-eminent?
"Oh, it is well enough as the production of a human composer, sung by featherless bipeds, to quote the late Diogenes."
I am the same philosopher who wrote each of the three hundred treatises commemorated by Diogenes Laertes."
Diogenes, Socrates, and Epaminondas, are gentlemen of the best blood who have chosen the condition of poverty when that of wealth was equally open to them.
One might hunt in vain for his equal, even with the lantern of Diogenes; his like is not to be had even by getting it made to order!"