Dionysius


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Di·o·ny·si·us

 (dī-ə-nĭsh′ē-əs, -nĭsh′əs, -nī′sē-əs) Known as "the Elder." 430?-367 bc.
Tyrant of Syracuse (405-367) noted for his campaigns against the Carthaginians in Sicily. His son Dionysius (395?-343?), known as "the Younger," succeeded him as tyrant in 367 and was exiled in 343 for his despotic rule.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Dionysius

(ˌdaɪəˈnɪsɪəs)
n
(Biography) called the Elder. ?430–367 bc, tyrant of Syracuse (405–367), noted for his successful campaigns against Carthage and S Italy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Di•o•ny•si•us

(ˌdaɪ əˈnɪʃ i əs, -ˈnɪs-, -ˈnɪʃ əs, -ˈnaɪ si əs)

n.
1. ( “the Elder” ), 431?–367 B.C., Greek soldier: tyrant of Syracuse 405–367.
2. Saint, died A.D. 268, pope 259–268.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dionysius - the tyrant of Syracuse who fought the Carthaginians (430-367 BC)Dionysius - the tyrant of Syracuse who fought the Carthaginians (430-367 BC)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Dionysius

[ˌdaɪəˈnɪsɪəs] NDionisio
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
Polygnotus depicted men as nobler than they are, Pauson as less noble, Dionysius drew them true to life.
When Dionysius heard this he permitted him to take his money with him, but forbid him to continue any longer in Sicily, as being one who contrived means for getting money inconsistent with his affairs.
For I have always borne that laudable partiality to my own country, which Dionysius Halicarnassensis, with so much justice, recommends to an historian: I would hide the frailties and deformities of my political mother, and place her virtues and beauties in the most advantageous light.
D'Artagnan raised the three or four boards which made his chamber another ear of Dionysius, spread a carpet on the floor, went upon his knees, and made a sign to Mme.
Where are Dionysius and Serapion, and Pericles, and Decius?
(Leviticus, xvii, 7.) The satyr was at first a member of the dissolute community acknowledging a loose allegiance with Dionysius, but underwent many transformations and improvements.
Dionysius I, who had threatened to decapitate the broad- browed philosopher, was a usurper and a despot.
Dionysius O'Gall of Bitternutt Lodge, Connaught, Ireland.
There were Cain and Nimrod, and Nero, and Caligula, and Dionysius, and Pisistratus, and - and a thousand others, who never knew what it was to have a soul during the latter part of their lives; yet, sir, these men adorned society.
"How was it that Dionysius the Tyrant became a schoolmaster?
Among the topics are observations on Aristarchus' Homeric studies, the oldest textual witness of John Tzetzes' Exegesis of the Iliad, Aristarchomastix: Dionysius of Sidon between epic and lyric poetry, a lexicographical collection in two manuscripts of Cyrillus' Lexicon and a new testimonium on Pindar, and around Europe in 200 years: the wanderings of ms.