Dionysius

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Di·o·ny·si·us

 (dī-ə-nĭsh′ē-əs, -nĭsh′əs, -nī′sē-əs) Known as "the Elder." 430?-367 bc.
Tyrant of Syracuse (405-367) noted for his campaigns against the Carthaginians in Sicily. His son Dionysius (395?-343?), known as "the Younger," succeeded him as tyrant in 367 and was exiled in 343 for his despotic rule.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Dionysius

(ˌdaɪəˈnɪsɪəs)
n
(Biography) called the Elder. ?430–367 bc, tyrant of Syracuse (405–367), noted for his successful campaigns against Carthage and S Italy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Di•o•ny•si•us

(ˌdaɪ əˈnɪʃ i əs, -ˈnɪs-, -ˈnɪʃ əs, -ˈnaɪ si əs)

n.
1. ( “the Elder” ), 431?–367 B.C., Greek soldier: tyrant of Syracuse 405–367.
2. Saint, died A.D. 268, pope 259–268.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dionysius - the tyrant of Syracuse who fought the Carthaginians (430-367 BC)Dionysius - the tyrant of Syracuse who fought the Carthaginians (430-367 BC)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Dionysius

[ˌdaɪəˈnɪsɪəs] NDionisio
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(Plato sailed several times to Syracuse in a futile attempt to institute an ideal state there by educating the philosophically minded tyrant Dionysius the Younger.) Lilla is right to argue that Plato's celebrated defense of the philosopher-king is meant as a cautionary tale, not a blueprint for political reform.