diorama

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di·o·ram·a

 (dī′ə-răm′ə, -rä′mə)
n.
1. A three-dimensional miniature or life-size scene in which figures, stuffed wildlife, or other objects are arranged in a naturalistic setting against a painted background.
2. A scene reproduced on cloth transparencies with various lights shining through the cloths to produce changes in effect, intended for viewing at a distance through an aperture.

[French, blend of dia-, through (from Greek; see dia-) and panorama, panorama (from English; see panorama).]

di′o·ram′ic (-răm′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diorama

(ˌdaɪəˈrɑːmə)
n
1. (Art Terms) a miniature three-dimensional scene, in which models of figures are seen against a background
2. (Art Terms) a picture made up of illuminated translucent curtains, viewed through an aperture
3. (Art Terms) a museum display, as of an animal, of a specimen in its natural setting
4. (Film) films a scene produced by the rearrangement of lighting effects
[C19: from French, from Greek dia- through + Greek horama view, from horan to see]
dioramic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

di•o•ram•a

(ˌdaɪ əˈræm ə, -ˈrɑ mə)

n., pl. -ram•as.
1. a scene in miniature reproduced in three dimensions by placing figures before a painted background.
2. a life-size display representing a scene from nature, a historical event, or the like, using stuffed wildlife, wax figures, etc., in front of a painted or photographed background.
3. a partly translucent picture viewed through an aperture.
[1815–25; < French, =di- di-3 + Greek (h)órāma view (horā-, variant s. of horân to see, look + -ma n. suffix of result)]
di`o•ram′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

diorama

1. a miniature, three-dimensional scene, often depicting a historical event.
2. an apparatus designed for giving extra realism to paintings by transmitting light through them in various colors and intensities at different times.
See also: Representation
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diorama - a picture (or series of pictures) representing a continuous scenediorama - a picture (or series of pictures) representing a continuous scene
ikon, picture, icon, image - a visual representation (of an object or scene or person or abstraction) produced on a surface; "they showed us the pictures of their wedding"; "a movie is a series of images projected so rapidly that the eye integrates them"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

diorama

[daɪəˈrɑːmə] Ndiorama m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

diorama

nDiorama nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
But to-morrow evening, Laurence, Clara, and yourself, and dear little Alice too, shall visit the Diorama of Bunker Hill.
Detonations and falls were heard on all sides, great overthrows of icebergs, which altered the whole landscape like a diorama. Often seeing no exit, I thought we were definitely prisoners; but, instinct guiding him at the slightest indication, Captain Nemo would discover a new pass.
The memory has as many moods as the temper, and shifts its scenery like a diorama. At this moment Mr.
There was a bright full moon, with heavy black, driving clouds, which threw the whole scene into a fleeting diorama of light and shade as they sailed across.
While his muscles were working lustily, his mind seemed as passive as a spectator at a diorama: scenes of the sad past, and probably sad future, floating before him and giving place one to the other in swift sucession.
"Since 2017, I've made 14 dioramas, which normally take anywhere from two weeks to two months to complete.
When the Ayala Museum opened in 1974, its cutting-edge crowd drawer were dioramas, three-dimensional representations of 60 events in Philippine history chosen by historian Carlos Quirino, the museum's founding director.
The improvement of the existing displays and the creation of new dioramas is an on-going process at the Museum, said the organizers.
Homeowners, phase representatives and community leaders, all have something special to offer from handcrafted dioramas to showcases of talents.
The children, their families and I collected a range of objects to be used in the dioramas and the children worked in their groups to create an environment within which their living thing might live.
An artist's best way of telling a story is through his art and Eddie Putera's dioramas present an interesting tale.