diplodocus

(redirected from Diplodocus carnegii)
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di·plod·o·cus

 (dĭ-plŏd′ə-kəs, dī-)
n.
A very large herbivorous sauropod dinosaur of the genus Diplodocus of the Jurassic Period, having a long neck and tail and a small head, and hind legs longer than the front legs.

[New Latin Diplodocus, genus name : Greek diplo-, diplo- + Greek dokos, beam; see dek- in Indo-European roots.]

diplodocus

(dɪˈplɒdəkəs; ˌdɪpləʊˈdəʊkəs)
n, pl -cuses
(Palaeontology) any herbivorous quadrupedal late Jurassic dinosaur of the genus Diplodocus, characterized by a very long neck and tail and a total body length of 27 metres: suborder Sauropoda (sauropods)
[C19: from New Latin, from diplo- + Greek dokos beam]

di•plod•o•cus

(dɪˈplɒd ə kəs)

n., pl. -cus•es.
any North American sauropod dinosaur of the genus Diplodocus: it grew to a length of about 87 ft. (26.5 m).
[< New Latin (1878) =diplo- diplo- + Greek dokós beam, bar, shaft]

di·plod·o·cus

(dĭ-plŏd′ə-kəs)
A very large plant-eating dinosaur of the Jurassic Period. Diplodocus had a long, slender neck and tail and a small head with peg-like teeth, and could grow to nearly 90 feet (27 meters) in length. It is one of the longest sauropod dinosaurs known.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diplodocus - a huge quadrupedal herbivore with long neck and taildiplodocus - a huge quadrupedal herbivore with long neck and tail; of late Jurassic in western North America
dinosaur - any of numerous extinct terrestrial reptiles of the Mesozoic era
genus Diplodocus - a reptile genus of the suborder Sauropoda
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The cast, which is made from plaster of Paris and resin, is an example of the Diplodocus carnegii species that lived between 145 and 156 million years ago and roamed North America.
Dippy is made from plaster of Paris and resin and was cast from the bones of a Diplodocus carnegii, thought to have roamed North America about 150million years ago.
It is an example of the Diplodocus carnegii species, which lived around 150 million years ago.