diplomatics

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dip·lo·mat·ics

 (dĭp′lə-măt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of paleography that deals with the study of old official documents and determines their age and authenticity.

diplomatics

(ˌdɪpləˈmætɪks)
n (functioning as singular)
1. (Library Science & Bibliography) the critical study of historical documents
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a less common word for diplomacy

diplomatics

the critical study of original historical documents, as registers, treaties, and charters, especially from medieval periods.
See also: Manuscripts
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than offer a diplomatic edition the editors have combined this with a critical apparatus to form a single, readable edition.
The balance of the book remains essentially the same: catalogues of legatine and provincial statutes, lists of medieval synods, statutes, manuscripts and manuscript references to statutes, and a fully annotated diplomatic edition of extant statutes (ten in total covering the period 1253-1498) together with six documents directly pertinent to them (1386-1498).
These include a facsimile edition, the record type edition, the diplomatic edition, and normalized edition.
In the following diplomatic edition, lineation, capitalization, and (lack of) punctuation are editorial; manuscript line boundaries are indicated by a vertical stroke (|); italics indicate the expansion of scribal abbreviations, including the Tironian note as and; and illegible or partly legible letters are enclosed in angled brackets.
The second section contains clear facsimile reproductions of the 88 double-sided leaves of thatch palm at about 50% of actual size, with a parallel diplomatic edition of the complete codex.
The diplomatic edition, he explains, is intended to reproduce the text of the work in a form as close as possible to the state in which the fifteenth-century scribe preserved the work.
Thus, the model presented follows the principles of the diplomatic edition. Broadly speaking, in this type of edition the work focuses on a single manuscript, which is transcribed and reproduced faithfully; therefore, scribal errors are usually retained and the suggested emendations may be included in the annotations, but not in the text as such.
A diplomatic edition of the property records, including accents, is also provided.
Explication of such difficulties is no part of Mario Di Cesare's diplomatic edition of the Bodleian Manuscript.
The text of the first edition has been available to scholars since the beginning of the twentieth century in the cumbersome form of a diplomatic edition of the 1516 and 1521 printings by Filippo Ermini, published in 1909-11.
Thus, a particular letter may be meticulously presented in a photographic reprint, a diplomatic edition, a translation, and in a descriptive bibliography, yet, remarkably, we never learn why this letter is important.
Jean Klene (Tempe: MRTS, 1997); The Verse Miscellany of Constance Aston Fowler: A Diplomatic Edition, ed.