diplomatic immunity

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diplomatic immunity

n.
The exemption enjoyed by diplomatic agents, their families, and members of their mission staffs from many ordinary criminal and civil laws of their host country, as determined under terms established by treaty and international law.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diplomatic immunity

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the immunity from local jurisdiction and exemption from taxation in the country to which they are accredited afforded to diplomats
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

diplomat′ic immu′nity


n.
exemption from taxation, searches, arrest, etc., enjoyed by diplomatic officials and their dependents under international law.
[1910–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diplomatic immunity - exemption from taxation or normal processes of law that is offered to diplomatic personnel in a foreign country
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
exemption, freedom - immunity from an obligation or duty
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

diplomatic immunity

nimmunità diplomatica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
After Tsai arrived, the man and his accomplices would benefit from diplomatic privilege to whisk the cigarettes past customs into Taiwan territory, reports said.
The Afghan government has contributed to its emergence by providing the Taleban's leaders with diplomatic privilege. Far from helping the Taleban to promote peace in Afghanistan, diplomatic status has enabled its leaders to interact with foreign actors to advance their cause and build international legitimacy, especially through the group's office in Qatar.
The Afghan government has contributed to its emergence by providing the Taliban's leaders with diplomatic privilege. Far from helping the Taliban to promote peace in Afghanistan, diplomatic status has enabled its leaders to interact with foreign actors to advance their cause and build international legitimacy, especially through the group's office in Qatar.
If there ever was a case of abuse of diplomatic privilege, the Khashoggi disappearance is as bad as it gets
Cayetano maintained that Villa and the diplomatic staff did not abuse their diplomatic privilege because embassy officials rescued distressed Filipino workers in coordination with Kuwaiti officials.
Secretary of State are clearly violating the first principle of diplomatic privilege by their joining such a protest rally.
She said: "It also took advantage of the entire system of diplomatic privilege."
(4) Another abuse of diplomatic privilege is found in the form of "deadbeat diplomats" who avoid paying spousal and child support by claiming immunity from jurisdiction of the courts.
Part III then discusses abuses of diplomatic privilege and exploitation of domestic workers.
The Japanese also ignored diplomatic privilege when they boarded British ships, stripping one Englishman at a search post.
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