direct current

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direct current

n. Abbr. DC
An electric current flowing in one direction only.

direct current

n
(General Physics) a continuous electric current that flows in one direction only, without substantial variation in magnitude. Abbreviation: DC Compare alternating current

direct′ cur′rent


n.
an electric current of constant direction, having a magnitude that does not vary or varies only slightly. Abbr.: DC Compare alternating current.
[1885–90]
di•rect′-cur′rent, adj.

di·rect current

(dĭ-rĕkt′)
An electric current flowing in one direction only, as in a battery. Compare alternating current. See Notes at current, Tesla.

direct current

An electric current that always flows in the same direction.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.direct current - an electric current that flows in one direction steadily
electrical energy, electricity - energy made available by the flow of electric charge through a conductor; "they built a car that runs on electricity"
alternating current, alternating electric current, AC - an electric current that reverses direction sinusoidally; "In the US most household current is AC at 60 cycles per second"
Translations

direct current

n (Elec) → corrente f continua
References in periodicals archive ?
In July 2017, transmission system operator TenneT awarded Nexans the contract to supply and install the cables for the DolWin6 direct-current link.
Switched-reluctance and permanent magnet brushless machines are now more popular than direct-current brush machines, he says, but are rarely included in introductory textbooks.
Mitsubishi Electric Corporation has launched a newly branded lineup, D-SMiree Diamond-Smart Medium Voltage Direct Current Distribution Network System for Innovative Reliable Economical Ecology for medium- and low-voltage direct-current (MV/LV DC) distribution systems of voltages 1,500V DC and below.
In 1954 the first high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) system was used to transmit electric power.
Presented at the National Maritime Conference in Bremerhaven, this direct-current technology enables a cost-efficient and simplified connection of offshore wind power plants far from the coast.
The emphasis is on simulating direct-current electrokinetic phenomena such as electroosmosis, electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis, and induced-charge electrokinetics; these phenomena have been widely used to manipulate fluids and particles in microfluidic and nanofluidic devices for various applications.
As a test, the researchers chemically induced spikes in the rat tissue to mimic those preceding a seizure and then exposed the neurons to a steady, direct-current field.

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