Disamis

Disamis

a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the third figure, in which there is one particular affirmative and one universal affirmative premise and a particular affirmative conclusion.
See also: Logic
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
These deductions are all particular, whether affirmative (see Darapti, Disamis, and Datisi) or privative (see Felapton, Ferison, and Bocardo).
The third deduction of the third figure is Disamis, whose premises are particular and universal: (50)
First, Aristotle converts the major premise "some S is P" into "some P is S." Second, he inverts the two premises, so that Disamis (3.3) becomes reducible to the complete deduction Darii (1.3) of the first figure:
To complete the reduction, the conclusion of Darii, that is, "some P is R," has to be converted into "some R is P," which is the conclusion of Disamis. Hence, the inferential necessity (or complete deducibility) of Darii is made to prove the potential, inferential necessity (or incomplete deductibility) of Disamis.
The fourth incomplete deduction is Datisi, using the same premises of Disamis, but in the inverted order: (51)