disc jockey

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Related to Disc jockeys: Mobile DJs

disc jockey

also disk jockey
n.
1. An announcer who presents and comments on popular recorded music, especially on the radio.
2. A turntablist.

disc jockey

n
(Pop Music) a person who announces and plays recorded music, esp pop music, on a radio programme, etc. Abbreviation: DJ or Abbreviationdj

disc′

(or disk′) jock`ey


n.
a person who selects, plays, and often comments on recorded music, as on a radio program or at a discotheque. Abbr.: DJ
[1940–45, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disc jockey - a person who announces and plays popular recorded musicdisc jockey - a person who announces and plays popular recorded music
broadcaster - someone who broadcasts on radio or television
Translations
diskžokej
djdisc jockey
tiskijukka
disk džokej
plötusnúîur
ディスクジョッキー
디스크 자키
diskdžokej
diskjockey
ผู้จัดรายการดนตรีแผ่นเสียง
disk jokeyplâk sunucusu
nhân viên DJ

disc jockey

nDiscjockey m

disc jockey

ndisc jockey m inv

disc,

disk

(disk) noun
1. a flat, thin, circular object. From the earth, the full moon looks like a silver disc.
2. a gramophone/phonograph record or compact disc.
3. in computing, a disc-shaped file.
disc jockey abbreviation ( DJ)
a person who presents a programme of music (usually pop-music) on the radio etc from records or discs.

disc jockey

دي جي - مُقَدِّمُ الأَغَانِي الـمُسَجَّلَة diskžokej dj Discjockey ντισκ τζόκεϊ disc jockey tiskijukka DJ disk džokej disck jockey ディスクジョッキー 디스크 자키 diskjockey disc jockey dyskdżokej disc jockey диск-жокей diskjockey ผู้จัดรายการดนตรีแผ่นเสียง disk jokey nhân viên DJ 唱片骑师
References in periodicals archive ?
ONE of Huddersfield's first mobile disc jockeys, Malcolm Schofield, has died.
Like all the disc jockeys at Flava, Jack Frost is not paid for his time.
The disc jockeys on KDND-FM's Morning Rave programme called the contest "Hold your Wee for a Wii".
But as the war wound down, stations began introducing disc jockeys into their program mix, and that meant there was less need for musicians.
The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is now pushing police to raid record stores that sell DJ mixes--CDs assembled by disc jockeys to advertise their ability to assemble other people's tracks into a danceable set.
In my view they need not have apologized for the remark to appease redneck disc jockeys.
Read in the music press that disc jockeys were wanted by a pirate radio station.
The disc jockeys I most admire are people like Pete Tong, who is well known on the Ibiza club scene, and singer Boy George.
Very few radio stations let their disc jockeys choose which songs they'll play; jocks today are paid for their voices, not their musical taste.