pragmatics

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prag·mat·ics

 (prăg-măt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
1. The study of language as it is used in a social context, including its effect on the interlocutors.
2. The branch of semiotics that deals with the relationship between signs, especially words and other elements of language, and their users.

pragmatics

(præɡˈmætɪks)
n (functioning as singular)
1. (Linguistics) the study of those aspects of language that cannot be considered in isolation from its use
2. (Linguistics) the study of the relation between symbols and those who use them

prag•mat•ics

(prægˈmæt ɪks)

n.
1. (used with a pl. v.) practical considerations.
2. (used with a sing. v.) a branch of semiotics dealing with the causal and other relations between words, expressions, or symbols and their users.
3. (used with a sing. v.) a branch of linguistics dealing with language in its situational context, including the knowledge and beliefs of the speaker and the relationship and interaction between speaker and listener.
[1935–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pragmatics - the study of language use
linguistics - the scientific study of language
Translations
pragmatika
pragmatika
pragmatikk

pragmatics

[prægˈmætɪks] NSINGpragmática f
the pragmatics of the job in handlas tareas prácticas del trabajo a realizar

pragmatics

[prægˈmætɪks] npragmatique f
References in periodicals archive ?
The conclusion is that these "long forms" "are not to be explained away with reference to semantics or syntax, but that they have a distinct discourse-pragmatic function: to signal that a discourse theme, a theme of intrinsic interest and not just instrumental interest, is present or changing"--in other words, prominence (pp.
They focus on semantic-functional oriented analysis, but also consider discourse-pragmatic studies related to socio-cultural interaction practices.
Among other findings, the interaction of scope and parallelism with ellipsis is reconsidered; the structural significance of modal anchoring and essential properties for the interpretation of indefiniteness is explored in detail; additionally, quantificational variability and correlativity phenomena in relative clauses are analyzed; degree expression is characterized for concessive conditionals and superlatives; and, finally, several discourse particles with a quantificational core are shown to be critical for the articulation of semantic and discourse-pragmatic relations.
In order to overcome the greater of these (i.e., the representation of the meaning of the construction as invariable), Guerrero Medina presents a corpus-based analysis of the semantic and discourse-pragmatic dimensions of the English conative construction, placing special emphasis on its connection, based on the parameters below, with the construction traditionally called "antipassive" in the functional-typological literature (Cooreman 1994): (i) identifiability and affectedness of the object; (ii) the aspectual changes in the predicate; and (iii) the lack of volitionality of the agent.
Linguists specializing in English explore the discourse-pragmatic semantic, morphological and syntactic factors involved in English morphosyntactic alternations within a wide range of contemporary theoretical approaches.
2010 "Modals 'shall' and 'will' in Shakespeare: A discourse-pragmatic analysis", in: Young-Se Kang, et al.
The discourse-pragmatic perspective has not provided a detailed description of although either.