disimprove

disimprove

(ˌdɪsɪmˈpruːv)
vb
to become or make worse
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Eddie's initial post on blogging reflected such incoherent prose: "Then my skills in writing will improve then disimprove."
The only thing I did to it was what I always do when editing Kane's copy: slightly disimprove it.
If the Democrats haven't been able to improve the health care of Americans, they have certainly striven mightily to disimprove the health of people not so far from Haiti.
"Rather than disimprove pupilteacher figures in schools, this was the choice that was made possible to me when we were looking at options and it made sense to me."
Manager Paul Hensey added: "It's a dry, bright day and the forecast shows no rain before race time, so while it's hard to say whether it will dry out any more, it won't disimprove." Jessica Lamb What they say Michael Halford, trainer of Casamento "He's adaptable ground-wise and I don't see any problems with the extra trip.
"However, a fall is unlikely in coming months and seasonal factors mainly associated with holidays in the educational sector will further disimprove the position in June." Mr Gilmore accused the Government of "throwing in the towel" and not fighting hard enough to hold on to jobs.
No more RUC, sorry PSNI, escorted walks in Hillsborough Castle grounds, no more rooting under the rose bushes, the food quality can only disimprove - and that's only Mandy I'm thinking of.
Kildare did improve gradually and as the playing surface continued to disimprove they stuck doggedly to their task.