disk crash


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disk crash

n
(Computer Science) computing the failure of a disk storage system, usually resulting from the read-write head touching the moving disk surface and causing mechanical damage
References in periodicals archive ?
While the recently added back-up features ensure that users can restore payroll data after a virus or disk crash, ezPaycheck's ability to work without internet access provides additional securing against viruses and spyware to prevent such events in the first place.
BackupMyTree enables worry-free research for genealogists and family history enthusiasts, preventing loss of years of work due to a computer disaster such as a virus or hard disk crash.
Harmful power fluctuations also result in critical data loss, burnt motherboard, hard disk crash, monitor failure or keyboard lock ups.
Even if some of the worst disasters strike, whether a natural disaster such as a fire, a machine disaster such as a hard disk crash, or a human disaster such as accidentally deleted files, if you regularly make backups and store at least some off-site, you'll greatly lessen your recovery time.
In essence, the secondary drive is an exact duplicate of the primary drive, and if either drive is damaged or suffers from a disk crash, the hard disk controller will automatically switch to the other, undamaged drive and warn you.
Yet I resort to replacing my PC every couple of years (or experience a fatal disk crash, whichever comes first).
Should a disaster occur at the business' location such as power cuts or spikes, viruses, accidental deletion, hard disk crash, PC theft, fire or flood then the data can be restored from the remote location.
We can come to rely on our PCs to such an extent that an unexpected hard disk crash and consequent data loss can be a personal disaster.
It has been years since I've had to deal with a disk crash, yet hardly a day passes without the operating system and application software conspiring to crash one or more of the machines in my office.
Today, most of us use computers and, sooner or later, we can expect a disk crash or some other unthinkable disaster.
I have been very negligent about backing up my files, and a hard disk crash would be catastrophic.
So now, instead of working on a cramped hard disk and risking a disk crash, you can store infrequently used programs on portable storage mediums and, when you need to run a program, just plug in the auxiliary drive, load the appropriate cartridge and you're in business.