displayed


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dis·play

 (dĭ-splā′)
v. dis·played, dis·play·ing, dis·plays
v.tr.
1.
a. To present to view; cause to be seen: The doctor displayed her diploma on the wall of her office. The autumn woods display a wide array of colors. See Synonyms at show.
b. To exhibit ostentatiously; show off: garish hosts who display their wealth whenever guests come over.
c. To show (images or information) on a screen: The time is displayed on the bottom right corner of the computer monitor.
2. To be or give evidence of; manifest or reveal: writing that displays broad knowledge; a decision that displays poor judgment.
3. To spread out; unfurl: The peacock displayed its fan.
4. Biochemistry To position (a protein, for example) on the surface of a biological entity such as a virus: proteins displayed on a bacteriophage.
v.intr.
Zoology To exhibit a behavioral display.
n.
1.
a. The act of displaying.
b. Ostentatious exhibition: an attention-seeker who was fond of display.
c. A public exhibition.
d. Objects or merchandise set out for viewing by the public.
2. A demonstration or manifestation: a display of temper.
3.
a. Zoology A specialized pattern of behavior used to communicate visually, such as the presentation of colors or plumage by male birds as part of courtship or intimidation.
b. An instance of such behavior.
4. An advertisement or headline designed to catch the eye.
5. An electronic device, such as a computer monitor or cell phone screen, that presents information in a visual form.
6. Biochemistry An in vitro method by which genetically engineered proteins are placed on the surface of a biological entity (such as a bacteriophage, yeast, or ribosome) so that the properties of these proteins and those they bind to can be analyzed and manipulated for research purposes.
Idiom:
on display
In public view; for all to see.

[Middle English displaien, from Anglo-Norman despleier, from Medieval Latin displicāre, to unfold, from Latin, to scatter : dis-, apart; see dis- + plicāre, to fold; see plek- in Indo-European roots.]
References in classic literature ?
There was an exchange of bugle blasts; then a parley from the walls, where men-at-arms, in hauberk and morion, marched back and forth with halberd at shoulder under flapping banners with the rude figure of a dragon displayed upon them; and then the great gates were flung open, the drawbridge was lowered, and the head of the cavalcade swept forward under the frowning arches; and we, following, soon found ourselves in a great paved court, with towers and turrets stretching up into the blue air on all the four sides; and all about us the dismount was going on, and much greeting and ceremony, and running to and fro, and a gay display of moving and intermingling colors, and an altogether pleasant stir and noise and confusion.
"Thank you, I am quite well," answered the Queen, demurely, as she sat up and displayed the tiny golden crown upon her head.
Normandy, with its vast variety of vegetation, its blue skies and silver rivers, displayed itself in all the loveliness of a paradise to the new sister of the king.
It must be owned, that if an interest displayed in his success could have bribed the Disinherited Knight, the part of the lists before which he paused had merited his predilection.
He executed the order in the twinkling of an eye, and unrolling a piece of tappa, displayed to my astonished gaze the identical pumps which I thought had been destroyed long before.
Leaves of the Nenuphars and silken skirts the same pale green, On flower and laughing face alike the same rose-tints are seen; Like some blurred tapestry they blend within the lake displayed: You cannot part the leaves from silk, the lily from the maid.
To this manly spirit, posterity will be indebted for the possession, and the world for the example, of the numerous innovations displayed on the American theatre, in favor of private rights and public happiness.
Both Montgomery and Moreau displayed particular solicitude to keep them ignorant of the taste of blood; they feared the inevitable suggestions of that flavour.
Great choice, according to the captain, is certainly displayed by the beaver in selecting the wood which is to furnish bark for winter provision.
For these one looked much more anxiously than for the charms of nature, which every where were so profusely displayed.
The rule applies very strongly in the case of secondary sexual characters, when displayed in any unusual manner.