distain

Related to distain: disdain

distain

(dɪsˈteɪn)
vb (tr)
to stain; to discolour
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References in periodicals archive ?
Their [Russia's] response has demonstrated complete distain for the gravity of these events," said Theresa May, who argued today that there was no other conclusion other than that Russia was responsible for the attack.
From the time of the missionaries and merchants until today's high-tech giants, Western eyes have traditionally viewed China through the prism of wishful thinking mixed with occasional distain and contempt.
SINGER and activist Glen Hansard has opened up about his distain for one of his biggest hits - allegedly about pal Damien Rice.
Throughout the book, the author highlights the British distain for American movies about the Battle of Britain that depict Americans as heroes who came over to England and saved the day.
A Juddmonte homebred, Part Exchange counts Group Three winner Distain amongst her siblings and she certainly seemed to have inherited some family ability when strolling away with what was only an average maiden at best.
While the cameras documented the distain Renee's friends had for Grundhoffer, they never showed what his relatives said about his wife.
We have shifted from a culture of distain of disorder to an appreciation of serendipity with increasing (licensed) street performances and pop-ups.
Which people work we ascertain, But those that don't we don't distain.
But it also shows the distain many corporations have for their own customers.
Angels can see the good inside them - and on this night they will led their gargoyle friends on a journey that belays the distain and fear people tend to display upon seeing gargoyles.
A: The concept of any one nation taking the role of "global policing" is troubling in itself, even more so when that nation has shown such distain for rule of law as the US has.
You've expressed distain for the term "robo-advisor.