divine right of kings

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divine right of kings

n
(Historical Terms) history the concept that the right to rule derives from God and that kings are answerable for their actions to God alone

divine′ right′ of kings′


n.
the right to rule derived directly from God, not from the consent of the people.
[1735–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.divine right of kings - the doctrine that kings derive their right to rule directly from God and are not accountable to their subjects; rebellion is the worst of political crimes; "the doctrine of the divine right of kings was enunciated by the Stuarts in Britain in the 16th century"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
References in classic literature ?
But he was naturally of an arbitrary disposition; and he had been bred at the University of Oxford, where young men were taught that the divine right of kings was the only thing to be regarded in matters of government.
The question as to whether there is such a thing as divine right of kings is not settled in this book.
Nonetheless, Jefferson needed a sound basis for declaring American rights as independent from the divine right of King George.
The success of European monarchies was due to the various strategies of legitimization they were developing in the face of the revolutionary menace, he says, dynastic succession in many cases, but some monarchs were able to continue exploiting the mass belief in the divine right of kings.
He was an absolute ruler who ruled in accordance with the divine right of kings.
What do alcohol, the divine right of kings, TV dinners, the Walkman, smart drinks, and the iPhone have in common?
This Great Charter was the basis on which jurists such as Edward Coke and William Blackstone rejected the divine right of kings and developed their rights-oriented approach toward legal theory.
Until we make the distinction between what Episcopal Bishop John Spong calls "Christendom" and true Catholicism, the perversions of absolute monarchy, like the divine right of kings to deflower virgins, will continue.
Well - he'll just ignore it and rule through the divine right of kings (or princes).
In the sixteenth century, various segments of the Church's own sons and daughters rose "in protest" against her: some against her belief that good works and not "faith alone" are required for salvation (Lutheranism); others against her belief in a God that seeks to save all men rather than one who destines some to eternal damnation (Calvinism); and others still against her rejection of the Absolute Divine Right of Kings, according to which a monarch is subject to no earthly authority and answers only to God (Anglicanism).
A growth in a theory of the divine right of kings led to arguments that there might be a right to rebellion against a tyrannical king.
Prime ministers and cabinets arrogantly believe they possess the divine right of kings.