Dniester

(redirected from Dnister)
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Related to Dnister: Nistru, Dniester River

Dnies·ter

 (nē′stər, dnyĕ′-) or Dni·stro (nē′strō, dnyē′-)
A river rising in western Ukraine and flowing about 1,365 km (850 mi) generally southeast through eastern Moldova then back into Ukraine where it empties into the Black Sea near Odessa. It formed the Soviet-Romanian border from 1918 to 1940.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Dniester

(ˈdniːstə)
n
(Placename) a river in E Europe, rising in Ukraine, in the Carpathian Mountains and flowing generally southeast to the Black Sea. Length: 1411 km (877 miles). Russian name: Dnestr Romanian name: Nistru
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Dnies•ter

or Dnes•tr

(ˈni stər; Russ. dnyɛstr)

n.
a river rising in SW Ukraine, flowing SE from the Carpathian Mountains through Ukraine and Moldavia to the Black Sea. ab. 875 mi. (1410 km) long.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
Nistru
Дністер
References in periodicals archive ?
The pair paid a Moldovan man to help them cross the Dnister River, into Ukraine, but were halted by border officials armed with guns.
The pair paid a Moldovan man to help them cross the Dnister River into Ukraine but were halted by border officials armed with guns.
The Romanian diplomat had tried to introduce the Dnister as line of demarcation between the Romanian and the Soviet army, which could be equated to the acknowledgement of the frontier between the two states.
We accepted the subdivision of Tsegelnyuk (1994), who concluded that the Lower Devonian platform strata in Ukraine are represented by the Lochkovian, which is subdivided into the Rukshyn and Tyver stages, and Pragian to Emsian referred to as the Dnister stage (Fig.
Szypenitz was named after a village in northern Bukovyna, while Dnipro and Dnister were the names of rivers in Western Ukraine.