denial-of-service attack

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denial-of-service attack

n. Computers
A malicious attack on a network resource that prevents legitimate users from accessing the resource, typically implemented by initiating an overwhelming number of spurious requests for service. Also called DoS attack.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
DoS attacks are very dangerous for systems and networks because they can cause serious delays in accessing servers and other resources due to the packet flooding.
As illustrated in Figure 1, two kinds of DoS attacks [2] are generally considered in SDN networks.
A 2016 (https://www.akamai.com/us/en/about/our-thinking/state-of-the-internet-report/global-state-of-the-internet-security-ddos-attack-reports.jsp) report from cloud service provider Akamai found 2015 was-at the time-the year with the highest number of reported DoS attacks. It's unclear how big of a role the arrested student played in that increase.
In fact, basic DoS attacks existed before the commercial internet, but it wasn't until the turn of the millennium that DDoS attacks began tormenting businesses.
IP fragmentation, SMTP mass mailing, DoS attacks, flood attacks, spoofing, are some of the attacks that detect in the network.
Just published, the Web Application Vulnerability Report 2015 from security vendor Acunetix also examined DoS attacks, SSL and perimeter vulnerabilities, among others.
Data Encryption, Data Hiding and Steganography, DOS Attacks and Distributed DOS Attacks, along with Phishing Attacks & Open Redirection Attacks, Cross Site Scripting Attacks and Data Sniffing & ARP Poisoning will feature in the seminar.
* To understand DoS attacks and phishing on computer systems;
DoS attacks involve myriad requests being sent to a single computer hosting a website, so that it is overloaded and effectively removed from the web.
Our proposed scheme improves Chuang and Chen's scheme in various aspects: (1) it checks the destination of messages and so it prevents the masquerade attack, (2) it withstands the smart card attack and the user impersonation attack even when the information in the smart card is disclosed, (3) it resists DoS attacks by checking the freshness of messages, and (4) it protects the security of previously-established session keys even when the adversary knows the long-term key [A.sub.i], thereby achieving perfect forward secrecy.
They also called for their followers to launch DoS attacks against local sites.