creationism

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cre·a·tion·ism

 (krē-ā′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
Belief in the supernatural origin of the universe or of humans and other living things, especially as based on the literal interpretation of the account of the creation related in the Bible.

cre·a′tion·ist adj. & n.

creationism

or

creatianism

n
1. (Theology) the belief that God brings individual human souls into existence at conception or birth. Compare traducianism
2. (Theology) the doctrine that ascribes the origins of all things to God's acts of creation rather than to evolution
creˈationist n
creˌationˈistic adj

cre•a•tion•ism

(kriˈeɪ ʃəˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. the doctrine that the true story of the creation of the universe is recounted in the Bible.
2. the doctrine that God creates out of nothing a new human soul for each individual born.
[1840–50]
cre•a′tion•ist, n., adj.

creationism Theology.

a doctrine that God creates a new soul for every human being bon. Cf. metempsychosis. — creationist, n. — creationistic, adj.
See also: Soul
the belief concerning the creation by a transcendant God of the universe, matter, and living organisms out of nothing. — creationist, n.
See also: Cosmology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.creationism - the literal belief in the account of Creation given in the Book of Genesiscreationism - the literal belief in the account of Creation given in the Book of Genesis; "creationism denies the theory of evolution of species"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
creation science - an effort to give scientific support for the truth of the account of Creation given in the Book of Genesis
Translations
Kreationismus
créationnisme
בריאתנות
kreacionizam
創造論

creationism

[kriːˈeɪʃənɪzəm] Ncreacionismo m

creationism

[kriˈeɪʃənɪzəm] ncréationnisme m

creationism

nKreationismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
The theological grounding here is the doctrine of creation that speaks not only of the giving of form to inchoate matter, but also of its telos, that is, its final coherence and completion.
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School was awarded a $4.2 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation to continue The Creation Project, a multiyear initiative on the Christian doctrine of creation within evangelical theology.
Among the topics are a proposal for advancing the theological interpretation of scripture, Genesis 1:2 and the doctrine of creation, what is Catholic about the Catholic epistles collection, reading the Exodus story with Melito and Origen, and reading the Old Testament with Dietrich Bonhoeffer.
Its positive feature was a focus on contributions that the doctrine of creation could make to the science-theology dialogue rather than a reconciliation of science with traditional views.
Thomas would also distinguish the doctrine of creation from what might be called creation myths or stories: those accounts of the world's origin and development found in traditions of the Ancient Near East and, by extension, of related accounts in the Americas (e.g., Aztec and Incan), Africa, Asia (especially Chinese and Japanese), as well as the narrative in the opening of the Book of Genesis.
Parler responds that this is where Yoder's Christ-centered doctrine of creation needs to be brought to the fore.
Two issues virtually unaddressed at the council are the role of women and the implications of the doctrine of creation for church and society.
That was particularly true when it came to the doctrine of creation. "Students had the idea that what the church has is a myth and what science has is actual knowledge.
Western attitudes to the environment are often, at a practical level and in effect, a denial of doctrine of creation. The gospel asks us to embrace a eucharistic acceptance of the gift of creation; we use only what we need, respecting and acknowledging the interdependence that is the vestige of the Triune God's creating presence in our universe.
The subject matter of the essays varies widely--the doctrine of creation, the decline of the Protestant churches, war, and more--but the volume's focus throughout is the decisive irruption in history of Jesus Christ and the church.
14:4); see my article, "The Doctrine of Creation ex nihilo and the Translation of tohuwabohu," in Pentateuchal Traditions in the Late Second Temple Period: Proceedings of the International Workshop in Tokyo, August 28-31, 2007, ed.