Doenitz


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Doe·nitz

also Dö·nitz  (dœ′nĭts), Karl 1891-1980.
German naval officer who was chief naval commander during World War II and briefly headed the German government after the death of Adolf Hitler (1945).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Doenitz

(German ˈdøːnɪts)
n
(Biography) a variant spelling of Dönitz
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, he told me how Field Marshall Montgomery addressed them on the Luneberg Heide, south of Hamburg, with the words: "Gentleman, Admiral Doenitz is going to accept unconditional surrender, but you still have one job to do.
Finally, he told me how Field Marshal Montgomery addressed them on the Luneberg Heide, south of Hamburg, with the words: "Gentleman, Admiral Doenitz is going to accept unconditional surrender, but you still have one job to do.
We revealed British troops had arrested members of the German High Command and that Karl Doenitz's short-lived government had been dissolved.
Blume J, Lange M, Rothenfusser E, Doenitz C, Bogdahn U, Brawanski A, et al.
Admiral Doenitz, Hitler's successor, complains that Frank should only have spoken as an individual, "for himself," not for the Germans as a group.
Anopheles aconitus Doenitz was the predominant species in the 1999 collection, but its vectorial status was unknown.
Spruance, Andrew Cunningham, Erich Raeder, and Karl Doenitz. Since the end of World War II, there have been only a few operational commanders who performed excellently in combat.
At Nuremberg, German Admiral-turned-head of state Karl Doenitz who stepped in to replace Adolf Hitler after his suicide was prosecuted.
The former Liberian leader is the first head of state, after Germany's Admiral Karl Doenitz (who was convicted by the Nuremburg court after the Second World War) to be convicted by an international court for war crimes and crimes against humanity.
The struggle reached its climax in the spring of 1943, March to May, when Allied antisubmarine efforts sank a record number of U-boats and forced Admiral Karl Doenitz to withdraw his submarine force from the mid-Atlantic.
Shortly after World War Two, Grand Admiral Karl Doenitz was the first German president put on trial.