dog fennel

(redirected from Dogfennel)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Dogfennel: Eupatorium capillifolium

dog fennel

n.
1. A weedy plant (Eupatorium capillifolium) in the composite family, native to the southeast United States and having pinnately divided leaves and long clusters of greenish flowers.
2. See mayweed.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dog fennel

n
1. (Plants) another name for mayweed
2. (Plants) a weedy plant, Eupatorium capillifolium, of the southeastern US, having divided leaves and greenish rayless flower heads: family Asteraceae (composites)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dog fennel - weedy plant of southeastern United States having divided leaves and long clusters of greenish flowersdog fennel - weedy plant of southeastern United States having divided leaves and long clusters of greenish flowers
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
2.dog fennel - widespread rank-smelling weed having white-rayed flower heads with yellow discsdog fennel - widespread rank-smelling weed having white-rayed flower heads with yellow discs
composite plant, composite - considered the most highly evolved dicotyledonous plants, characterized by florets arranged in dense heads that resemble single flowers
Anthemis, genus Anthemis - dog fennel
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tank-mix options for control of tropical soda apple and dogfennel. Gainesville, FL: Univ.
The outer zone was approximately 4 m (13 ft) wide and contained primarily sedges (Carex spp.) and small forbs like dogfennel (Eupatorium capillifolium Lam.) and goldenrod (Solidago canadensis L.).
House (1989) demonstrated that predatory soil arthropods were abundant in the root systems of dogfennel, Eupatorium capillifolium (Lam.) Small, and rough pigweed, Amaranthus retroflexus L., present in experimental corn and soybean plantings.