doggery

doggery

(ˈdɒɡərɪ)
n, pl -geries
1. surly behaviour
2. (Zoology) dogs collectively
3. a mob

Doggery

 a company of dogs, 1843.
References in classic literature ?
So me and the duke went up to the village, and hunted around there for the king, and by and by we found him in the back room of a little low doggery, very tight, and a lot of loafers bullyrag- ging him for sport, and he a-cussing and a-threatening with all his might, and so tight he couldn't walk, and couldn't do nothing to them.
That old fool had made a trade and got forty dollars, and when we found him in the doggery the loafers had matched half-dollars with him and got every cent but what he'd spent for whisky; and when I got him home late last night and found the raft gone, we said, 'That little rascal has stole our raft and shook us, and run off down the river.'"
She and her husband owned and operated a dog boutique, the Doggery, in Beverly Hills, Calif.
They would have been Diggory and Doggery. That woman has the face of a film star.
Title: Orts and All - More Ribald Rhymes and Gay Doggery Author: Clive MurphyPublished by: Brick Lane BooksISBN: 0 9541563 1 5Price: GBP9.95 Reviewer: Matt Stewart
Those predisposed to this ideology thrill when Thomas Carlyle writes that the captains of industry are doomed not to chivalry but to "doggery," or when he equates these same captains of industry with buccaneers and Choctaw Indians, "whose supreme aim in fighting is that they get the scalps, the money, that they may amass scalps and money." For, "What is it that they have a hundred thousand-pound bills laid up in their strong room, a hundred scalps hung up in the wigwam?" (3) They feel akin to John Ruskin as he portrays success in business competition due to business acumen as a large man pulling himself up to a table where children are being fed, and, reaching over their heads, takes their food just because he can.