dogma

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dog·ma

 (dôg′mə, dŏg′-)
n. pl. dog·mas or dog·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
1. A doctrine or a corpus of doctrines relating to matters such as morality and faith, set forth in an authoritative manner by a religion.
2. A principle or statement of ideas, or a group of such principles or statements, especially when considered to be authoritative or accepted uncritically: "Much education consists in the instilling of unfounded dogmas in place of a spirit of inquiry" (Bertrand Russell).

[Latin, from Greek, opinion, belief, from dokein, to seem, think; see dek- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dogma

(ˈdɒɡmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
1. (Theology) a religious doctrine or system of doctrines proclaimed by ecclesiastical authority as true
2. (Philosophy) a belief, principle, or doctrine or a code of beliefs, principles, or doctrines: Marxist dogma.
[C17: via Latin from Greek: opinion, belief, from dokein to seem good]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dog•ma

(ˈdɔg mə, ˈdɒg-)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
1. a system of principles or tenets, as of a church.
2. a specific tenet or doctrine authoritatively put forth, as by a church.
3. prescribed doctrine: political dogma.
4. an established belief or principle.
[1590–1600; < Latin < Greek, =dok(eîn) to seem, think, seem good + -ma n. suffix]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dogma - a religious doctrine that is proclaimed as true without proof
article of faith, credendum - (Christianity) any of the sections into which a creed or other statement of doctrine is divided
church doctrine, religious doctrine, creed, gospel - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group
2.dogma - a doctrine or code of beliefs accepted as authoritative; "he believed all the Marxist dogma"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dogma

noun
1. blind faith, certainty, unquestioning belief, arrogant conviction freeing the country from the grip of dogma
2. doctrine, teachings, principle, opinion, article, belief, creed, tenet, precept, credo, article of faith, code of belief the dogma of the Immaculate Conception
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

dogma

noun
A principle taught or advanced for belief, as by a religious or philosophical group:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عَقيدَه
dogma
dogmetrossætning
dogmidoktriini
dogma
kredda; trúarkenning; kenningakerfi
dogma
dogma
dogmat
dogma
dinî inanışdogma

dogma

[ˈdɒgmə] N (dogmas or dogmata (pl)) [ˈdɒgmətə]dogma m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dogma

[ˈdɒgmə] ndogme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dogma

nDogma nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dogma

[ˈdɒgmə] ndogma m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

dogma

(ˈdogmə) noun
opinions settled or fixed by an authority, eg the Church.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The patient and dignified grief that speaks through Frost and Calasso, the thinking of the analogy, is proudly free of dogmaticism, but, as Calasso himself conceded in his earlier La Folie Baudelaire, "You can simply ignore it.
This dialogue and occasional open disagreement between the contributors energizes the volume and saves it from the dogmaticism of its acknowledged ancestor, Gary Taylor and Michael Warren's The Division of the Kingdoms (1983).
Although certain scholars (Earthman) have seen reader-response as a middle ground between the objective dogmaticism of the (old) new critics and the radical subjectivism of the language-oriented postmodernists (what Gary Saul Morson calls "semiotic totalitarianism"), other critics maintain that the practical use of the RR model by college teachers approaches the problematic direction of near total readerly subjectivity (cf.