dolmen

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dol·men

 (dōl′mən, dŏl′-)
n.
A Neolithic tomb consisting of two or more upright stones with a capstone, believed to have been buried in earth except for a central opening.

[French (introduced in 1792 as a technical term by Théophile Malo de La Tour d'Auvergne-Corret, French soldier and antiquarian ), either from Cornish dolmen, form (with grammatical mutation of the initial consonant) of tolmen, dolmen, literally "hole of stone" (Cornish tol, hole (since people or animals can pass under a dolmen); akin to Welsh twll and Old Irish toll + Cornish men, stone; akin to Breton maen; see menhir), or from misinterpretation of Breton *daolvaen, form (with grammatical mutation of the initial consonant) of *taolvaen, literally, "table of stone" (Breton taol, table from Middle Breton, from Latin tabula, board + Breton maen, stone; see menhir).]

dolmen

(ˈdɒlmɛn)
n
1. (Archaeology) (in British archaeology) a Neolithic stone formation, consisting of a horizontal stone supported by several vertical stones, and thought to be a tomb
2. (Archaeology) (in French archaeology) any megalithic tomb
[C19: from French, probably from Old Breton tol table, from Latin tabula board + Breton mēn stone, of Celtic origin; see table]

dol•men

(ˈdoʊl mɛn, -mən, ˈdɒl-)

n.
a structure usu. regarded as a tomb, consisting of two or more large, upright stones set with a space between and capped by a horizontal stone.
[1855–60; < French < Cornish, variant (by lenition) of tolmen hole of stone (taken by French archaeologists to mean cromlech)]
dol•men′ic, adj.

dolmen

a construction consisting of two or more upright stones with a third on top, regarded by archaeologists as an ancient tomb or monument.
See also: Stones

dolmen

A Neolithic structure consisting of a large flat stone supported horizontally on two or more upright stones, thought to have been used as a tomb.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dolmen - a prehistoric megalithic tomb typically having two large upright stones and a capstonedolmen - a prehistoric megalithic tomb typically having two large upright stones and a capstone
megalith, megalithic structure - memorial consisting of a very large stone forming part of a prehistoric structure (especially in western Europe)
Translations

dolmen

[ˈdɒlmɛn] ndolmen m inv
References in classic literature ?
The Celtic dolmen and cromlech, the Etruscan tumulus, the Hebrew galgal, are words.
Cela evitera par exemple aux proprietaires des carrieres de dynamiter des grottes ou des dolmens difficilement identifiables.
While the Church destroyed some dolmens, others were considered sacred.
However, because they are located in mountain areas and their architecture--despite the personality and originality of some monuments--has elements that allude to prior burial architecture--dolmens and cists--, Barandiaran (1950) proposed an evolution: there are dolmens that have an 'espil or stone circumference similar to a 'baratzak' or small Pyrenean stone circles.
1) ANCIENT IRELAND HISTORY buffs will get to enjoy attractions that are older than the pyramids, such as passage tombs, dolmens and Stone Age observatories in the East.
INCHEON -- Syed Maratib Ali Shah put Pakistan on the medal table of XVII Asian Games when he won the bronze medal after losing his semifinal 70 KG fight against Kun Zhang of China in the Wushu Sanda event at Ganjhwa Dolmens Gymnasium here on Tuesday.
Kazakhstan's Rishat Livensho won silver medal in the men's 65kg wushu sanda final match against Mohsen Mohammadseifi of Iran at the 2014 Asian Games at the Ganghwa Dolmens gymnasium in Incheon on September 24, 2014.
Archeologist Yasser Abu Noktah said that the discovered dolmens at al-Maysara Spring consist of roofs with huge flagstones, on which animals' drawings are carved, adding that a number of stone and flint tools were also unearthed at the site.
His explorations in parts of Palakkad, Wayanad and Idukki have yielded a large number of port-holed cists, dolmens, menhirs, iron implements, etc.
Over the last two decades the writer has conducted a campaign to visit as many as possible of the dolmens of Western Europe and the Mediterranean region, and to measure their orientations.
Sakar is especially rich in dolmens, and regularly more such remains from Thracian times are discovered.