dolmen

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Related to Dolmens: portal tomb, Stonehenge, Hunebed

dol·men

 (dōl′mən, dŏl′-)
n.
A Neolithic tomb consisting of two or more upright stones with a capstone, believed to have been buried in earth except for a central opening.

[French (introduced in 1792 as a technical term by Théophile Malo de La Tour d'Auvergne-Corret, French soldier and antiquarian ), either from Cornish dolmen, form (with grammatical mutation of the initial consonant) of tolmen, dolmen, literally "hole of stone" (Cornish tol, hole (since people or animals can pass under a dolmen); akin to Welsh twll and Old Irish toll + Cornish men, stone; akin to Breton maen; see menhir), or from misinterpretation of Breton *daolvaen, form (with grammatical mutation of the initial consonant) of *taolvaen, literally, "table of stone" (Breton taol, table from Middle Breton, from Latin tabula, board + Breton maen, stone; see menhir).]

dolmen

(ˈdɒlmɛn)
n
1. (Archaeology) (in British archaeology) a Neolithic stone formation, consisting of a horizontal stone supported by several vertical stones, and thought to be a tomb
2. (Archaeology) (in French archaeology) any megalithic tomb
[C19: from French, probably from Old Breton tol table, from Latin tabula board + Breton mēn stone, of Celtic origin; see table]

dol•men

(ˈdoʊl mɛn, -mən, ˈdɒl-)

n.
a structure usu. regarded as a tomb, consisting of two or more large, upright stones set with a space between and capped by a horizontal stone.
[1855–60; < French < Cornish, variant (by lenition) of tolmen hole of stone (taken by French archaeologists to mean cromlech)]
dol•men′ic, adj.

dolmen

a construction consisting of two or more upright stones with a third on top, regarded by archaeologists as an ancient tomb or monument.
See also: Stones

dolmen

A Neolithic structure consisting of a large flat stone supported horizontally on two or more upright stones, thought to have been used as a tomb.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dolmen - a prehistoric megalithic tomb typically having two large upright stones and a capstonedolmen - a prehistoric megalithic tomb typically having two large upright stones and a capstone
megalith, megalithic structure - memorial consisting of a very large stone forming part of a prehistoric structure (especially in western Europe)
Translations

dolmen

[ˈdɒlmɛn] ndolmen m inv
References in classic literature ?
It was then passing over Mabunguru, a stony country, strewn with blocks of syenite of a fine polish, and knobbed with huge bowlders and angular ridges of rock; conic masses, like the rocks of Karnak, studded the soil like so many Druidic dolmens; the bones of buffaloes and elephants whitened it here and there; but few trees could be seen, excepting in the east, where there were dense woods, among which a few villages lay half concealed.
he still, without doubt, sleeps, lost, forgotten, beneath the rock the shepherds of the heath take for the gigantic abode of a dolmen .
The Celtic dolmen and cromlech, the Etruscan tumulus, the Hebrew galgal, are words.
D'autres sites protohistoriques sont recenses a Ain El Bey et Bounouara qui compte des architectures funeraires (dolmens et tumulus) et qui sont serieusement menaces par les carrieres.
However, because they are located in mountain areas and their architecture--despite the personality and originality of some monuments--has elements that allude to prior burial architecture--dolmens and cists--, Barandiaran (1950) proposed an evolution: there are dolmens that have an 'espil or stone circumference similar to a 'baratzak' or small Pyrenean stone circles.
In this context, we want to note that there are various dolmens that have dates suggesting recent burials (Fernandez Eraso and Mujika, 2013; Mujika, 2007-2009), which nearly coincides with the beginning of most incinerations.
Archeologist Yasser Abu Noktah said that the discovered dolmens at al-Maysara Spring consist of roofs with huge flagstones, on which animals' drawings are carved, adding that a number of stone and flint tools were also unearthed at the site.
According to a report in the Jordan Times, the dolmens foothills of Damiyah were listed among 77 endangered sites around the world on the World Monuments Fund (WMF) annual watch list.
Sakar is especially rich in dolmens, and regularly more such remains from Thracian times are discovered.
Similarly, the terms dolmens, menhirs, and cromlechs, words of Breton or Welsh origin that mean stone table, long stone, and stone circle, seem to be full of mystical content.
I discover a dolmen is thought to be a burial site for community leaders, while a cromlech is a sanctuary and gathering place on the winter and summer solstice and for other ancient rituals around a grouping of elliptical stones.