Dolmetsch


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Dolmetsch

(ˈdɒlmɛtʃ)
n
(Biography) Arnold. 1858–1940, British musician, born in France. He contributed greatly to the revival of interest in early music and instruments
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Attorney Michael Avenatti will demand records from Nike that his lawyer claims will clear him of extortion charges and prove that people at the sportswear giant illegally funneled money to elite high school basketball players, Bloomberg's Chris Dolmetsch and Gerald Porter Jr.
Byline: Chris Dolmetsch, Erik Larson and Polly Mosendz Bloomberg
Terence said David boarded at Lord Wandsworth College in Hampshire, where a performance on recorder and harpsichord by acclaimed musicians Carl Dolmetsch and Joseph Saxby in 1951 began his lifelong passion for early music.
Since the publication of Arnold Dolmetsch's Interpretation of the Music of the XVII and XVIII Centuries Revealed by Contemporary Evidence (London: Novello, 1915), musicians embracing "performance practice" have been using primary sources to determine the original performance environment, local conventions, and historical style to recreate as best as can be determined the composer's intentions.
Byline: Chris Dolmetsch, Bloomberg and Christopher Yasiejko
(144.) See id:, see also Chris Dolmetsch, New York Big-Soda Ban
Others emerge in remembrance, such as the violinist Arnold Dolmetsch, alongside a female friend who is brown "come il rosario di Filippo II dipinto da Juan Pantoja"/"Arnold Dolmetsch reappears to me, with his petite companion [...] dark as the rosary of Felipe II painted by Juan Pantoja" (D'Annunzio, 1995: 195; D'Annunzio, 2012: 253), or his comrade-in-arms Oreste Salomone, whose eyes are "solitari come quelli che s'allungano fra tempia e tempia dei martiri allineati nell'oro musivo della basilica di Ravenna"/"as lonely as those that span, from temple to temple, the faces of martyrs aligned in the mosaic gold of Ravenna's basilica" (D'Annunzio, 1995: 217; D'Annunzio, 2012: 283).