domestication

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do·mes·ti·cate

 (də-mĕs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. do·mes·ti·cat·ed, do·mes·ti·cat·ing, do·mes·ti·cates
1. To cause to feel comfortable at home; make domestic.
2. To adopt or make fit for domestic use or life.
3.
a. To train or adapt (an animal or plant) to live in a human environment and be of use to humans.
b. To introduce and accustom (an animal or plant) into another region; naturalize.
n. (-kət, -kāt′)
A plant or animal that has been adapted to live in a human environment.

do·mes′ti·ca′tion n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.domestication - adaptation to intimate association with human beings
adaption, adaptation, adjustment - the process of adapting to something (such as environmental conditions)
2.domestication - the attribute of having been domesticated
tractability, tractableness, flexibility - the trait of being easily persuaded
3.domestication - accommodation to domestic life; "her explorer husband resisted all her attempts at domestication"
accommodation, adjustment, fitting - making or becoming suitable; adjusting to circumstances
Translations
تَدْجين
domestikace
tæmning
megszelídítés
zdomácnenie
evcilleştirme

domestication

[dəʊˌmestɪˈkeɪʃən] Ndomesticación f

domestication

[dəˌmɛstɪˈkeɪʃən] n [animals] → domestication f

domestication

n (of wild animal, hum: of person) → Domestikation f, → Domestizierung f; the domestication of cats doesn’t take longes dauert nicht lange, bis man Katzen stubenrein gemacht hat

domestic

(dəˈmestik) adjective
1. of or in the house or home. a domestic servant; domestic utensils.
2. concerning one's private life or family. domestic problems.
3. (of animals) tame and living with or used by people.
4. not foreign. the Government's domestic policy.
doˈmesticated (-keitid) adjective
1. (of animals) accustomed to living near and being used by people. Cows and sheep have been domesticated for many thousands of years.
2. good at doing jobs associated with running a house. My husband has become very domesticated since I've been ill.
doˌmestiˈcation noun
domesticity (doumeˈstisəti) noun
(fondness for) home life.
domestic help
(a person paid to give) assistance with housework etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Muscle Power Economy (Human or Animal): Many argue that rapid developments first started with domestication of animals. The domestication of work animals morphed into the farming revolution around 8000 BC.
The first was the agrarian revolution which allowed humankind to shift from foraging to farming and was made possible by the domestication of animals. Food production improved, transportation improved, population grew and human settlements became larger leading to the rise of cities.
The domestication of animals for food, secondary products, labour and companionship over the past 11,000 years has led to a global distribution of domesticated species with distinct geographical patterns.
During the initial stages of domestication of animals, the selection of certain characteristics to be promoted during selective breeding led our ancestors to select individuals that were less fearful of them, and less aggressive towards them.
The advisory notes that areas, where domestication of animals is very high, can be affected by this disease.
Areas with very high domestication of animals can be affected by the disease.
The Neolithic period, beginning around 15,200 BC in the Middle East and ending in other parts of the world between 4500 and 2000 BC, was a time of many new activities, such as the beginning of farming, domestication of animals, polished stone tools and finer crafts like pottery and weaving.
Within seven generations from the time the first humans were created, they already had language, knew how to use fire (necessary in metallurgy), had already settled to live in a relatively permanent location abandoning nomadism, had built a city, had experienced the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution, had mastered the domestication of animals, had developed metallurgical skills and could forge tools from metals such as copper and iron.
The Neolithic age dates to around 8,000 BC, a time when agriculture and the domestication of animals such as sheep and goats emerged, incorporating the late Stone Age.
The discovery of the civilization, named Al-Maqar after the site's location, will challenge the theory that domestication of animals took place 5,500 years ago in Central Asia, said Ali Al-Ghabban, vice president of antiquities and museums at the SCTNH.