redshift

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red shift

or red·shift (rĕd′shĭft′)
n.
An increase in the wavelength of radiation emitted by a receding celestial object as a consequence of the Doppler effect.

[From the fact that the longer wavelengths of light are at the red end of the visible spectrum.]

redshift

(ˈrɛdˌʃɪft)
n
(Astronomy) a shift in the lines of the spectrum of an astronomical object towards a longer wavelength (the red end of an optical spectrum), relative to the wavelength of these lines in the terrestrial spectrum, usually as a result of the Doppler effect caused by the recession of the object. Compare: blueshift

red•shift

(ˈrɛdˌʃɪft)

n.
a shift in the spectrum of a celestial object toward longer wavelengths, caused by the object's movement away from the viewer.
[1920–25]
red′shift`ed, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.redshift - (astronomy) a shift in the spectra of very distant galaxies toward longer wavelengths (toward the red end of the spectrum); generally interpreted as evidence that the universe is expanding
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
propagation - the movement of a wave through a medium
References in periodicals archive ?
Moret-Bailly, "The difficult determination of Impulse Stimulated Raman Scattering redshift against Doppler redshift," http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0110525.
Despite the acceptance of the Doppler redshift described by Hubble's law, there are problems with this model.
This large Doppler redshift could be caused only by light coming from the quickly expanding, you universe.