Doric order


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Doric order
Doric order capital

Doric order

n.
1. The oldest and simplest of the three main orders of classical Greek architecture, characterized by heavy fluted columns with plain, saucer-shaped capitals and no base.
2. A Roman order of similar design but with the addition of a base.
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Noun1.Doric order - the oldest and simplest of the Greek orders and the only one that normally has no baseDoric order - the oldest and simplest of the Greek orders and the only one that normally has no base
order - (architecture) one of original three styles of Greek architecture distinguished by the type of column and entablature used or a style developed from the original three by the Romans
References in periodicals archive ?
The owner also added a family room, cinema room, indoor swimming pool and leisure facilities with tennis court and football pitch, and created a large classical pediment to the front of the house and four giant Doric order columns to the entrance.
The current owners attached the large classical pediment and the four giant Doric order columns to the front in 2010.
Although the primitive Doric order was employed, as on so many contemporary architectural monuments, the whole conception was quite unlike anything else --very different, say, from the contemporary German monument to the Battle of the Nations at Leipzig with its brutal sculptures by Mestrovic's supposed rival, Fritz Metzner.
The intriguing array of issues includes such topics as asceticism and pleasure in German health reform, visual pleasure and film censorship in comparative perspective, abstinence in British marriages from the 1890s through the 1940s, Adolf Loos and the Doric order, austerity in interior design during the interwar period in Flanders, Marie Curie and the culture of professional science, and discipline in the age of affluence.
Fed by the classic ruins of Rome and its surroundings, it was enriched by sources as different as elaborate Egyptian decorations and the Doric Order of Magna Graecia (the awesomely austere temples at Paestum).
For example in a comparison of The Temple of Hephaestus built in Athens in 449 BC using the Doric Order and St.