dormouse

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Related to Dormice: Gliridae

dor·mouse

 (dôr′mous′)
n. pl. dor·mice (-mīs′)
Any of various small omnivorous rodents of the family Gliridae of Eurasia and Africa, having long furred tails and known for their long hibernation periods.

[Middle English, perhaps alteration (influenced by mous, mouse) of Anglo-Norman *dormeus, inclined to sleep, hibernating, from Old French dormir, to sleep; see dormant.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dormouse

(ˈdɔːˌmaʊs)
n, pl -mice
(Animals) any small Old World rodent of the family Gliridae, esp the Eurasian Muscardinus avellanarius, resembling a mouse with a furry tail
[C15: dor-, perhaps from Old French dormir to sleep, from Latin dormīre + mouse]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dor•mouse

(ˈdɔrˌmaʊs)

n., pl. -mice (-ˌmaɪs)
any small usu. bushy-tailed Old World climbing rodent of the family Gliridae.
[1400–50; late Middle English dormowse, dormoise, perhaps Anglo-French derivative of Old French dormir to sleep (see dormant), with final syllable reanalyzed as mouse]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dormouse

- A rodent but not a mouse, it may be a corrupted form of French dormeus, "sleepy."
See also related terms for mice.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dormouse - small furry-tailed squirrel-like Old World rodent that becomes torpid in cold weatherdormouse - small furry-tailed squirrel-like Old World rodent that becomes torpid in cold weather
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
family Gliridae, Gliridae - dormice and other Old World forms
Glis glis, loir - large European dormouse
hazel mouse, Muscardinus avellanarius - a variety of dormouse
lerot - dormouse of southern Europe and northern Africa
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

dormouse

[ˈdɔːmaʊs] N (dormice (pl)) → lirón m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dormouse

[ˈdɔːrmaʊs] [dormice] [ˈdɔːrmaɪs] (pl) nloir m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dormouse

n pl <dormice> → Haselmaus f; edible or fat dormouseSiebenschläfer m; common dormouseGemeiner Siebenschläfer
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dormouse

[ˈdɔːˌmaʊs] n (dormice (pl)) [ˈdɔːˌmaɪs]ghiro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
How a Gardener may get rid of the Dormice that eat His Peaches.
"Still it belongs to government, and I ought not to waste it; but, having received the signal that I might rest for an hour" (here he glanced at the sun-dial, for there was everything in the enclosure of Montlhery, even a sun-dial), "and having ten minutes before me, and my strawberries being ripe, when a day longer -- by-the-by, sir, do you think dormice eat them?"
"Indeed, I should think not," replied Monte Cristo; "dormice are bad neighbors for us who do not eat them preserved, as the Romans did."
Did the Romans eat them?" said the gardener -- "ate dormice?"
"And, then, such as it is, it is filled with dormice, who eat everything."
"I have just discovered how a gardener may get rid of the dormice that eat his peaches."
The rest of the animals, like the dormice and the water-voles and the bats, they will have to go back and live in the fields where they were born till we come home again.
There were bundles of labels, cupboards, and drawers with compartments, and wire guards for the cupboards, to allow free access to the air whilst keeping out slugs, mice, dormice, and rats, all of them very curious fanciers of tulips at two thousand francs a bulb.
It's hibernation time, so say night to hedgehogs, bats, dormice, some insects (bumblebees, some butterflies, ladybirds), amphibians (frogs, toads, newts) and reptiles (grass snakes, adders, slow worms).
Edible dormice living in tree stands lacking this tree use the fruits of other species, such as oak Quercus sp., hazel Corylus avellana, hornbeam Carpinus betulus, dogwoods Cornus sp., hawthorn Crataegus sp., maple Acer sp., apple tree Malus sp., pear Pyrus sp., wild cherry Prunus avium, birch Betula sp., glossy buckthorn Frangula alnus, blackberry Rubus sp.
RARE endangered dormice on the brink of extinction in Warwickshire have gone missing from vandalised nest boxes, sparking a police appeal.
AN ESTATE of new luxury homes has been delayed - so builders don't wake sleeping dormice.