Douglass


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Frederick Douglass

Doug·lass

 (dŭg′ləs), Frederick 1817-1895.
American abolitionist and journalist who escaped from slavery (1838) and became an influential lecturer in the North and abroad. He wrote Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845) and cofounded and edited the North Star (1847-1860), an abolitionist newspaper.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Doug•lass

(ˈdʌg ləs)

n.
Frederick, 1817–95, U.S. abolitionist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Douglass - United States abolitionist who escaped from slavery and became an influential writer and lecturer in the North (1817-1895)Douglass - United States abolitionist who escaped from slavery and became an influential writer and lecturer in the North (1817-1895)
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References in classic literature ?
In the month of August, 1841, I attended an anti- slavery convention in Nantucket, at which it was my happiness to become acquainted with FREDERICK DOUGLASS, the writer of the following Narrative.
DOUGLASS to address the convention: He came forward to the platform with a hesitancy and embar- rassment, necessarily the attendants of a sensitive mind in such a novel position.
DOUGLASS could be persuaded to conse- crate his time and talents to the promotion of the anti-slavery enterprise, a powerful impetus would be given to it, and a stunning blow at the same time inflicted on northern prejudice against a colored complexion.
It is certainly a very remarkable fact, that one of the most efficient advocates of the slave population, now before the public, is a fugitive slave, in the person of FREDERICK DOUGLASS; and that the free colored population of the United States are as ably represented by one of their own number, in the per- son of CHARLES LENOX REMOND, whose eloquent appeals have extorted the highest applause of multi- tudes on both sides of the Atlantic.
DOUGLASS has very properly chosen to write his own Narrative, in his own style, and according to the best of his ability, rather than to employ some one else.
This Narrative contains many affecting incidents, many passages of great eloquence and power; but I think the most thrilling one of them all is the de- scription DOUGLASS gives of his feelings, as he stood soliloquizing respecting his fate, and the chances of his one day being a freeman, on the banks of the Chesapeake Bay--viewing the receding vessels as they flew with their white wings before the breeze, and apostrophizing them as animated by the living spirit of freedom.
DOUGLASS has frankly disclosed the place of his birth, the names of those who claimed ownership in his body and soul, and the names also of those who committed the crimes which he has alleged against them.
DOUGLASS states that in neither of these instances was any thing done by way of legal arrest or judicial investigation.
DOUGLASS, on this point, is sustained by a cloud of witnesses, whose veracity is unimpeachable.
The crowd filed up the aisles: the aged and needy postmaster, who had seen better days; the mayor and his wife -- for they had a mayor there, among other unnecessaries; the justice of the peace; the widow Douglass, fair, smart, and forty, a generous, good-hearted soul and well-to-do, her hill mansion the only palace in the town, and the most hospitable and much the most lavish in the matter of festivities that St.
A sharp barking told where Possum still waged hysterical and baffled war on the Douglass squirrels.
In his earliest speeches, Frederick Douglass specialized in blistering critiques of an American Christianity that could countenance slavery.