Dovzhenko


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Dovzhenko

(Russian dovˈʒenko)
n
(Biography) Aleksandr Petrovitch (alɪkˈsandr peˈtrɔvɪtʃ). 1894–1956, Soviet film director. His films include Zemlya (1930) and Ivan (1932)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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When photographs of Kosmodemianskaya's execution were found among the effects of a killed German soldier, the filmmaker Aleksandr Dovzhenko wrote commentary for them, lingering on Kosmodemianskaya's suffering, feminine frailty (although she 'resembles' a male-gendered fighter):
It is useful to prepare yourself in advance, choose and prioritize the events." Talking about the outcomes of the festival, he noted all that preparatory work conducted by the NGOs "Contemporary Ukrainian Cinema" and "Initiative for the Future," with the help of the specialists of the Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Center.
En cuanto al montaje, algunos directores/teoricos del cine sovietico de los anos 20 (Pudovkin, Vertov, Dovzhenko y Eisenstein) y la nueva ola francesa ofrecen modos alternativos de organizar el espacio-tiempo con el montaje, los cuales son distintos del sistema de continuidad.
Hicks focuses on documentaries filmed during World War II to make an intriguing argument that movies such as Aleksander Dovzhenko's 1943 Bitva za nashu Sovetskuiu.
A hard-core cinephile whose filmmaking taste owes as much to the heroic, sculptural, and populist Soviet portraiture of Boris Barnet, Alexander Dovzhenko, Sergei Eisenstein, and Dziga Vertov as to the expressive and expressionist lighting and color schemes of such Hollywood artisans as John Ford, Howard Hawks, Nicholas Ray, and Tourneur, Costa has gone so far as to describe Horse Money as a "horror action film"; the seeming paradox of marrying the blunt realities of a Ventura and a Vitalina with the studio-contrived artifice of a Lewton quickie is central both to his methods and to the philosophical suppositions underlying them.
Giving significant space to the work of Aleksandr Dovzhenko and Mark Donskoi in order to explicate the complex relationship between filmmakers and the Soviet state, Hicks hypothesises that Dovzhenko's documentary, Victory in Right Bank Ukraine (Pobeda na Pravoberezhnoi Ukraine, Aleksandr Dovzhenko, 1945), might have expressed anti-Semitism through interviews with collaborators had the filmmaker not been stripped of the necessary resources to carry out the venture successfully after his project Ukraine in Flames had been banned by Stalin.
As Rivette remarks, if Earth (Alexander Dovzhenko, 1930) and Mother (Vsevolod Pudovkin, 1926) have lost much of their prestige over the years, it is because their directors "had no secrets, only techniques," while the example of Eisenstein is rather one of "a filmmaker who wagered on the secret," subordinating all the spectacular aspects of his films to "an entirely abstract and aloof thought." Rivette concludes this article by affirming that the content of these secrets is ultimately of secondary importance: Eisenstein's will be different from Mumau's or Renoir's, just as Mallarme's secrets were different from Balzac's; "what's important is that they exist."
Several chapters concentrating on specific operators and their working relationship (almost symbiotic) with their directors follow: Tisse and Eizenshtein; Golovnia and Pudovkin; Demuts'kyi and Dovzhenko; and Moskvin and the wonderful and wildly experimental collective, the factory of the Eccentric Actor.
It's shot like a Dovzhenko film [and composed like CEazanne's still life], and impressively designed, with a simple yet striking interplay of red and white, and Kaul incredibly employs this hyper de-dramatised style to amplify the eventual pay off."