Dowland


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Dowland

(ˈdaʊlənd)
n
(Biography) John. ?1563–1626, English lutenist and composer of songs and lute music
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Dow•land

(ˈdaʊ lənd)
n.
John, 1563–1626, English lutenist and composer.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.Dowland - English lutenist and composer of songs for the lute (1563-1626)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Colin Dowland's script, Headless, was selected from over 200 entrants to win the third Liverpool Hope Playwriting Prize.
Traffic Police has asked citizen to register their complaints or suggestion at their helpline 1915, facebook page facebook.com/PeshawarTrafficManagentSystem or dowland ' RAABTA' app from playstore.
The exhibition has been assembled by a group of volunteers from among current and retired staff and students, led by researcher Jonathan Dowland and Professor Brian Randell, who joined the computing department at Newcastle in the late 1960s from IBM's T J Watson Research Center in New York.
Jude's Cathedral was built by Dowland Contracting Ltd., with whom the diocese entered into an informal arrangement to pay back the money as funds were raised.
On Thursday, October 6, at Stokesley Methodist Church, guitarist Sam Rodwell's programme includes pieces by Dowland, Paganini, Alebiz Ryan and Jose.
At the Shoe Factory in Nicosia, Larousse -- with his guitar in hand -- will take us back and forth in time for an atmospheric and wide-ranging programme spanning from the poetic landscape of the English Renaissance (John Dowland) through the exotic and unconventional sounds of the Far East (Toru Takemitsu) to the dreamy and passionate tunes of Spain (Joaquin Turina and Fernando Sor).
The duo will perform a repertoire that comprises French Airs de Cour by the composer Crecquillon, whose works are rarely performed, followed by songs by John Dowland.
It will feature Purcell's Dido's Lament, Dowland's When Phoebus First Did Phoebus First Did Love and Monteverdi's Lamento d'Arianna.
"There are different reasons for this shift," says report author Jared Dowland. "Larger practices are seeking to consolidate from multiple EMRs and tighten their relationships with nearby hospitals, while smaller practices are seeking to resolve functionality, support and cost concerns."
Bach's Art of the Fugue, songs by John Dowland, Monteverdi's L'Orfeo, Heinrich SchEtz's Symphonie sacrae, Arcangelo Corelli's Violin Sonata in A Major, George Frideric Handel's Rinaldo, "Begli occhi" from a cantata by Barbara Strozzi, Henry Purcell's King Arthur, and Georg Phillip Telemann's Ouverture burlesque de Quixotte.
40641 (ex Berlin) also edited by Spencer, and then four important English lute sources: volume 3 (2003): The Folger"Dowland" Manuscript (now at the Folger Shakespeare Library, MS V.b.280, with music by John Dowland but no longer thought to be in his hand; volume 4 (2004): The Welde Lute Book (now in the private library of Lord Forester at Willey Park, Shropshire; volume 5 (2007): Osborn fb7 (Yale University Music Library MS 13); and volume 6 (2008): The "Wickhambrook" Lute Manuscript (Yale University Music Deposit), all with detailed critical notes and introductions.
The music - inspired by the likes of Dowland, Purcell and Mozart - is built around themes, eddying, swaying and exercising the musicians' skill and their ability to remain on the edge of total abandon, while all the time being in total virtuosic control.