divining rod

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di·vin·ing rod

(dĭ-vī′nĭng)
n.
A forked branch or stick that is believed to indicate subterranean water or minerals by bending downward when held over a source.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

divining rod

n
(Mining & Quarrying) a rod, usually a forked hazel twig, said to move or dip when held over ground in which water, metal, etc, is to be found. Also called: dowsing rod
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

divin′ing rod`


n.
a rod, esp. a forked stick, commonly of hazel, supposedly useful in locating underground water or metal deposits. Also called dowser.
[1745–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.divining rod - forked stick that is said to dip down to indicate underground water or oildivining rod - forked stick that is said to dip down to indicate underground water or oil
stick - an implement consisting of a length of wood; "he collected dry sticks for a campfire"; "the kid had a candied apple on a stick"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
virgule
taikavarpu

divining rod

[dɪˈvaɪnɪŋrɒd] Nvarilla f de zahorí
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

divining rod

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

divining rod

[dɪˈvaɪnɪŋˌrɒd] nbacchetta
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
During the event investigators will lead ghost-hunting vigils in small groups using ouija boards, dowsing rods and crystals.
People would use branches as dowsing rods and make crosses of rowan twigs to protect themselves on Halloween, while in old Europe, householders would put elderberry branches above their doorways to protect their homes from malevolent spirits.
During the evening, you will attempt to communicate with the spirit world using dowsing rods and crystal dowsing pendulums as a way to communicate during vigils.
? During the Vietnam War, US marines used dowsing rods to find weapons and enemy rat-holes.
I was at a loss until it became apparent that they had mistaken Dave for some sort of surveyor, and had thought his dowsing rods to be some form of theodolite.
Dowsing rods to detect energy were drawn to one area where they said a portal could exist allowing entities access to the gardens.
He used to carry a pair of Lshaped dowsing rods, which he called the Rod of Moses, to answer questions from students, find concentration of energy fields or, perhaps, even locate missing objects.
For rookie ghost hunters, dowsing rods - more commonly found used in well witching - help detect changes in a room's energy, which could mean the presence of a spirit, the ghost hunters said.
Dowsing means using a simple pendulum or a pair of dowsing rods to identify energy within the home.
Ghost guide Marg Royce enticed them to the table, while a member of the group held the dowsing rods.
minarets, dowsing rods, the body's short joyride, the 5 feet
I read your article on the "Utility and Limits of Dowsing Rods to Chart the Subsurface" with interest.