genome

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ge·nome

 (jē′nōm′)
n.
1. The total genetic content contained in a haploid set of chromosomes in eukaryotes, in a single chromosome in bacteria or archaea, or in the DNA or RNA of viruses.
2. An organism's genetic material.


ge·no′mic (-nō′mĭk) adj.

genome

(ˈdʒiːnəʊm) or

genom

n
1. (Genetics) the full complement of genetic material within an organism
2. (Biology) all the genes comprising a haploid set of chromosomes
[C20: from German Genom, from Gen gene + (chromos)ome]
genomic adj

ge•nome

(ˈdʒi noʊm)

n.
a full haploid set of chromosomes with all its genes; the total genetic constitution of a cell or organism.
[1925–30; < German]
ge•no′mic, adj.

ge·nome

(jē′nōm)
The total amount of genetic information in the chromosomes of an organism, including its genes and DNA sequences. The genome of eukaryotes is made up of a single, haploid set of chromosomes that is contained in the nucleus of every cell and exists in two copies in the chromosomes of all cells except reproductive cells. The human genome is made up of about 30,000 genes. ♦ The scientific study of genomes is called genomics (jə-nō′mĭks).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genome - the ordering of genes in a haploid set of chromosomes of a particular organism; the full DNA sequence of an organism; "the human genome contains approximately three billion chemical base pairs"
ordering, ordination, order - logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements; "we shall consider these questions in the inverse order of their presentation"
Translations
genom
genomiperimä
génállománygenom
erfðamengi
ゲノム
genoom
genom
genoma
genom
genom

genome

[ˈdʒiːnəʊm] Ngenoma m

genome

[ˈdʒiːnəʊm] ngénome m

genome

n (Biol) → Genom nt

genom

, genome
n. genoma, el conjunto básico completo de cromosomas haploides en un organismo.

genome

n genoma m; human — genoma humano
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the Human Genome Project produced the first draft sequence of the human genome in 2000, the cost of sequencing has dropped exponentially, from around $100 million USD per genome to around $1,000 USD today.
The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) published in the international journal Science a chromosome-based draft sequence of the bread wheat genome.
The draft sequence is a major landmark towards obtaining a complete reference sequence of the hexaploid bread wheat genome, the ultimate aim of the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium.
The draft sequence of the wheat variety, Chinese Spring, includes the location of more than 124,000 genes, many of which relate to grain quality, pest resistance or stress tolerance.
The commercial company Celera was competing against worldwide government-funded institutions, including the UK's Sanger Centre, to produce the first draft sequence.
For the sequencing, the scientists used a Chinese variety called "Hongyang," which is widely grown in China, to produce the draft sequence.
This work yielded the draft sequence of a waterfowl-duck for the first time, and the data indicated that the duck, like the chicken and zebra finch, possessed a contractive immune gene repertoire comparing to those in mammals, and it also comprises novel genes that are not present in the other three birds (chicken, zebra finch and turkey).
A team of international scientists from the Tomato Genome Consortium (TGC), including Indians, sequenced the genome of domesticated tomato cultivar 'Heinz 1706' and a draft sequence of its wild ancestor olanum pimpinellifolium that reveals the order, types and positions of the 35,000 genes that are arranged on 12 chromosomes.
The draft sequence of the human genome was completed in 2000, and scientists, funding agencies, and industry all claimed at the time that this groundbreaking accomplishment would translate into benefits for modern medicine by identifying "druggable" protein targets.
This year (2010) is the 10th anniversary of completion of draft sequence.
The completion of the first draft sequence of the oil palm genome and progress on the jatropha genome are significant milestones towards the genetic improvement of these inherently high yielding oil crops.

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