Drimys winteri


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Noun1.Drimys winteri - South American evergreen tree yielding winter's bark and a light soft wood similar to basswood
Drimys, genus Drimys - shrubs and trees of southern hemisphere having aromatic foliage
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
winter's bark - aromatic bark having tonic and stimulant properties
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the more unusual varieties can be found in the lower garden, the winter's bark, Drimys winteri. Its leaves are high in Vitamin C and were once eaten to prevent scurvy.
(1998) found experimental removal of occlusions (referred to as plugs) in leaves of Drimys winteri, a tree of wet forests, resulted in lower water loss than otherwise occurred.
Zapata and Smagghe [88] demonstrated that the [LC.sub.50] after 24h of Laurelia sempervirens (Monimiaceae) and Drimys winteri (Winteraceae) EOs against T.
The effects of the essential oil and hydrolate of canelo (Drimys winteri) on adults of Aegorhinus superciliosus in the laboratory.
Based on the results of our group, some metabolites from Cestrum parqui (Lamarck) L'Heritier (Solanaceae) and Drimys winteri J.
My final selection is Winter's Bark, Drimys winteri. It takes its name from Captain John Winter, an officer who set off with Sir Francis Drake on his circumnavigation voyage, and it was he who first discovered the tree's medicinal qualities.
*Co: Coihue (Nothofagus dombeyi), Ra: Rauli (Nothofagus alpina), Te: Tepa (Laureliopsis philippiana), Ro: Roble (Nothofagus obliqua), Ca: Canelo (Drimys winteri), Myrt: Myrtaceae.
(5) Polygodial is a component also of various other plants found throughout the world, including Persicaria hydropiper (water pepper), a popular spice in traditional Japanese cuisine (6) and in the bark of the South American tree Drimys winteri (Winters Bark), used by the British sailor John Winter in the 16th century and later by Captain James Cook and his crew in the South Pacific, to treat scurvy.
"El laurel, el folle (canelo, Drimys winteri), los arboles son como las personas, nuestros hijos", senala un residente de Milleuco.