drive-through

(redirected from Drive through)
Also found in: Idioms.

drive-through

or drive-thru (drīv′thro͞o′)
adj.
1. Relating to or conducting exchanges with clients who drive up to a window and remain in their vehicles: drive-thru banking.
2. drive-through Performed or provided quickly and routinely: a drive-through delivery in a hospital.
n.
1. A drive-through establishment, especially a restaurant.
2. A window at such an establishment, from which business is conducted.
3. The lane by which drivers approach such a window and drive away after being served: decided to go through the drive-through rather than eating inside.

drive-through

or

drive-thru

n
1. a takeaway restaurant, shop, etc designed so that customers can use it without leaving their cars
2. (Other Non-sporting Hobbies) a takeaway restaurant, shop, etc designed so that customers can use it without leaving their cars
3. (Automotive Engineering) a takeaway restaurant, shop, etc designed so that customers can use it without leaving their cars
adj
4. of or relating to a drive-through establishment: a drive-through burger bar.
5. (Automotive Engineering) of or relating to a drive-through establishment: a drive-through burger bar.

drive′-through`

or drive′-thru`,


n.
1. a window, as at a restaurant or bank, to which customers drive up to be served.
2. an establishment having such a window.
adj.
3. of or being a drive-through.
[1945–50]
Translations

drive

(draiv) past tense drove (drouv) : past participle driven (ˈdrivn) verb
1. to control or guide (a car etc). Do you want to drive (the car), or shall I?
2. to take, bring etc in a car. My mother is driving me to the airport.
3. to force or urge along. Two men and a dog were driving a herd of cattle across the road.
4. to hit hard. He drove a nail into the door; He drove a golf-ball from the tee.
5. to cause to work by providing the necessary power. This mill is driven by water.
noun
1. a journey in a car, especially for pleasure. We decided to go for a drive.
2. a private road leading from a gate to a house etc. The drive is lined with trees.
3. energy and enthusiasm. I think he has the drive needed for this job.
4. a special effort. We're having a drive to save electricity.
5. in sport, a hard stroke (with a golf-club, a cricket bat etc).
6. (computers) a disk drive.
ˈdriver noun
a person who drives a car etc. a bus-driver.
ˈdriver's license noun
(American) a driving licence.
ˈdrive-in adjective
(of a cinema, café etc, especially in North America) catering for people who remain in their cars while watching a film, eating etc. a drive-in movie.
ˈdrive-through adjective
that one may drive through (and do something without getting out of the car). a drivethrough bank/restaurant/zoo.
ˈdriving licence noun
a licence for driving a road vehicle.
be driving at
to be trying to say or suggest. I don't know what you're driving at.
drive off
1. to leave or go away in a car etc. He got into a van and drove off.
2. to keep away. to drive off flies.
3. in golf, to make the first stroke from the tee.
drive on
1. to carry on driving a car etc. Drive on – we haven't time to stop!
2. to urge strongly forward. It was ambition that drove him on.
References in classic literature ?
It was "after a bit," as she said, for when the carriage passed through the park gates there was still two miles of avenue to drive through and the trees (which nearly met overhead) made it seem as if they were driving through a long dark vault.
But ahead of them was a lane with houses on either side, so evidently the snow had been blown across the road and they had to drive through the drift.
The Man of Wrath loathes picnics, and has no eye for nature and frozen seas, and is simply bored by a long drive through a forest that does not belong to him ; a single turnip on his own place is more admirable in his eyes than the tallest, pinkest, straightest pine that ever reared its snow-crowned head against the setting sunlight.