drought

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drought

 (drout) also drouth (drouth)
n.
1. A long period of abnormally low rainfall, especially one that adversely affects growing or living conditions.
2. A prolonged dearth or shortage.

[Middle English, from Old English drūgoth; akin to drȳge, dry.]

drought′y adj.

drought

(draʊt)
n
1. (Environmental Science) a prolonged period of scanty rainfall
2. a prolonged shortage
3. an archaic or dialect word for thirst Archaic and Scot form: drouth
[Old English drūgoth; related to Dutch droogte; see dry]
ˈdroughty adj

drought

(draʊt)

n.
1. a period of dry weather, esp. a long one that is injurious to crops.
2. an extended shortage; scarcity; dearth.
3. Archaic. thirst.
Sometimes, drouth (drouth).
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English drūgath <drūg- (base of drȳge dry)]
drought′y, adj. drought•i•er, drought•i•est.
drought′i•ness, n.
pron: Because drought and drouth represent two phonetic developments of the same Old English word and are pronounced (drout) and (drouth) respectively, the latter is not a mispronunciation of drought. The now unproductive suffix -th1 and its alternate form -t were formerly used to derive nouns from adjectives or verbs, resulting in such pairs as drouth/drought from dry, and highth/height (the former now obsolete) from high. In American English, drought is common everywhere in educated speech and is the usual printed form.

drought

(drout)
A long period of abnormally low rainfall.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drought - a shortage of rainfalldrought - a shortage of rainfall; "farmers most affected by the drought hope that there may yet be sufficient rain early in the growing season"
dryness, waterlessness, xerotes - the condition of not containing or being covered by a liquid (especially water)
2.drought - a prolonged shortage; "when England defeated Pakistan it ended a ten-year drought"
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"

drought

noun
1. water shortage, dryness, dry weather, dry spell, aridity, lack of rain, drouth (Scot.), parchedness Drought and famines have killed up to two million people.
water shortage flood, deluge, downpour, inundation
2. shortage, lack, deficit, deficiency, want, need, shortfall, scarcity, dearth, insufficiency The Western world was suffering through the oil drought.
shortage abundance, profusion
Translations
جَفَافجَفاف، قَحْط، مَحْل
sucho
tørke
kuivuus
suša
aszály
langvarandi òurrviîriþurrkar
日照り
가뭄
sausra
sausums
suša
torka
ความแห้งแล้ง
hạn hán

drought

[draʊt] Nsequía f

drought

[ˈdraʊt] nsécheresse f

drought

nDürre f; three droughts in as many yearsdrei Dürrekatastrophen in ebenso vielen Jahren

drought

[draʊt] nsiccità

drought

(draut) noun
(a period of) lack of rain. The reservoir dried up completely during the drought.

drought

جَفَاف sucho tørke Dürre ξηρασία sequía kuivuus sécheresse suša siccità 日照り 가뭄 droogte tørke susza seca засуха torka ความแห้งแล้ง kuraklık hạn hán 旱灾

drought

n. sequía.
References in classic literature ?
The crops upon Mars are always uniform, for there are no droughts, no rains, no high winds, and no insects, or destroying birds.
As for conflagrations and great droughts, they do not merely dispeople and destroy.
It is a vale whose acquaintance is best made by viewing it from the summits of the hills that surround it--except perhaps during the droughts of summer.
10] These droughts to a certain degree seem to be almost periodical; I was told the dates of several others, and the intervals were about fifteen years.
Thoughtful hands had taken care of the vines and rose-bushes on the trellises; water--that precious element in Devil's Ford--had not been spared in keeping green through the long drought the plants which the girls had so tenderly nurtured.
Nothing flourished in the cold, moist, pitiless atmosphere, drifting with the brackish scud of sea-breezes, except the moss along the joints of the shingle-roof, and the great bunch of weeds, that had lately been suffering from drought, in the angle between the two front gables.
He must have been born in some time of general drought and famine, or upon one of those fast days for which his state is famous.
Yet so vast is the quantity of blood in him, and so distant and numerous its interior fountains, that he will keep thus bleeding and bleeding for a considerable period; even as in a drought a river will flow, whose source is in the well-springs of far-off and undiscernible hills.
Sparkling in the sunshine, gleaming under the summer moon, cold and gray beneath a November sky, trickling over the dam in some burning July drought, swollen with turbulent power in some April freshet, how many young eyes gazed into the mystery and majesty of the falls along that river, and how many young hearts dreamed out their futures leaning over the bridge rail, seeing "the vision splendid" reflected there and often, too, watching it fade into "the light of common day.
A cup of wine will do thee no harm,'' he added, filling and handing to the swineherd a richer drought than Gurth had ever before tasted.
He told him, too, of the dangers and the horrors of the jungle; of the great beasts that stalked one by day and by night; of the periods of drought, and of the cataclysmic rains; of hunger; of cold; of intense heat; of nakedness and fear and suffering.
The house occupied by the family was on the slope of a mountain, and after a long drought there was a terrible tempest which not only raised the river to a great height but loosened the surface of the mountain so that a great landslide took place.