druse

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druse
amethyst geode

druse

 (dro͞oz)
n.
A cavity or opening in rock lined with tiny crystals, usually composed of the same minerals that occur in the rock.

[German, weathered ore, probably from Middle High German druos, gland, tumor, from Old High German.]

druse

(druːz)
n, pl druse or drusen
1. (Minerals) an aggregate of small crystals within a cavity, esp those lining a cavity in a rock or mineral
2. (Botany) botany a globular mass of calcium oxalate crystals formed around an organic core, found in some plant cells
[C19: from German, from Old High German druos bump]

Druse

(druːz) or

Druze

n, pl Druse or Druze
(Other Non-Christian Religions)
a. a member of a religious sect, mainly living in Syria, Lebanon, and Israel, having certain characteristics in common with Muslims
b. (as modifier): Druse beliefs.
[C18: from Arabic Durūz the Druses, after Ismail al-Darazi Ismail the tailor, 11th-century Muslim leader who founded the sect]
ˈDrusean, ˈDrusian, ˈDruzean, ˈDruzian adj

druse

(druz)

n.
an incrustation of small crystals on the surface of a rock or mineral.
[1805–15; < German; compare Middle High German, Old High German druos gland, tumor, German Drüse gland (Middle High German drües, pl. of druos)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.druse - an adherent of an esoteric monotheistic religious sect living in the relative security of the mountains of Syria and Lebanon who believes that Al-hakim was an incarnation of GodDruse - an adherent of an esoteric monotheistic religious sect living in the relative security of the mountains of Syria and Lebanon who believes that Al-hakim was an incarnation of God; "a Druze is permitted to conform outwardly to the faith of the unbelievers among whom he lives"
adherent, disciple - someone who believes and helps to spread the doctrine of another
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Bruna Aparecida Souza Machado (1) * (iD) Ivana Silva Gomes (2) Cassiane da Silva Oliveira Nunes (3) Graciele de Queiroz Andrade (2) Tatiana Barreto Rocha Nery (4) Joao Henrique de Oliveira Reis (2) Josiane Dantas Viana Barbosa (4) Janice Izabel Druzian (2)
Glucose is usually the most widely used carbon source in the production of xanthan gum (Rosalam & England, 2005), but other sources have been successfully studied to substitute and cheapen the process, such as whey (Nitschke, Rodrigues, & Schinatto, 2001), apple juice residue (Druzian & Pagliarini, 2007), soluble compounds of the green coconut shell (Nery, Cruz, & Druzian, 2013), cassava whey (Brandao, Esperidiao, & Druzian, 2010), sugarcane juice (Brandao, Nery, Machado, Esperidiao, & Druzian, 2008), lignocellulosic agro-industrial wastes (Silva et al., 2018) and glycerin from biodiesel (Brandao et al., 2013).
This is a viable alternative for the use of fillet waste (Costa, Portz, Hisano, Druzian & Ledo, 2009), as well as being a simple, low-cost operating technique used for the conversion of waste material into products of high nutritional quality, which can minimize problems with environmental pollution, as well as serve as an ingredient in feed formulation.
Dominguez, I., Cabanelas, Z., Arbib, F., Chinalia, C., Oliveira Souza, J., Perales, P., Almeida, J., Izabel Druzian, I., & Andrade, N.