Dunciad


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Dunciad

 a world of fools, 1728.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Mr Pope, however, very luckily found them in the said play, and, laying violent hands on his own property, transferred it back again into his own works; and, for a further punishment, imprisoned the said Moore in the loathsome dungeon of the Dunciad, where his unhappy memory now remains, and eternally will remain, as a proper punishment for such his unjust dealings in the poetical trade.
It was after he had finished the Odyssey that Pope wrote his most famous satire, called the Dunciad. In this he insulted and held up to ridicule all stupid or dull authors, all dunces, and all those whom he considered his enemies.
'Dunciad,' with quite a furious ardor in the tiresome quarrels it celebrates, and an interest in its machinery, which it fatigues me to think of.
The piece is interesting chiefly because it suggested Pope's 'Dunciad.' Now, in 1682, the political tide again turned against Shaftesbury, and he fled from England.
In his modern Dunciad the chien mechant of Trinity College would say to scholars as well as to readers of his poetry, "Terence, this is stupid stuff" (Shropshire 62).
(22) Alexander Pope, ed., The Dunciad in Four Books, Valerie Rumbold (Harlow: Longman, 1999), 3-7.
One considers paper, ink and achievement in terms of three bibliopoles; and the unending Dunciad as Pope's weird revenge.
The very force of Pope's rhetoric when pleading with his reader, now exhorting him, now treating him with irony or contempt, is sufficient evidence that he felt this corporateness threatened with destruction, and in An Essay on Man, he called up a vision of judgment which anticipates the return to anarchy at the end of The Dunciad:
In his footnotes to The Dunciad (1728-1743) Pope explicitly called attention to lines he patterned after Milton's in sections he headed "Imitations," kindly pointed out to me by my colleague David Vander Meulen.
While her cultural efforts aroused some criticism and mockery--she was characterised by Alexander Pope at his most waspish, in The Dunciad, as the Queen of Dulness--on the whole her efforts to establish the philanthropic nature of the monarchy, for example by opening her gardens to the polite public, were well-received.
Chapter six makes an in-depth exploration of The Dunciad, which is one of the last pieces of work produced by Pope.
In his collected writings, the literary allusions range from the physics of Lucretius's De Rental Natura through Pope's Dunciad to the metaphysics of Heideggerian time.