Dundee


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Dun·dee

 (dŭn-dē′)
A city of east-central Scotland on the northern bank of the Firth of Tay. It was a stronghold of the Covenanters in the religious wars of the Scottish Reformation.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Dundee

(dʌnˈdiː)
n
1. (Placename) a port in E Scotland, in City of Dundee council area, on the Firth of Tay: centre of the former British jute industry; university (1967). Pop: 154 674 (2001)
2. (Placename) City of Dundee a council area in E Scotland. Pop: 143 090 (2003 est). Area: 65 sq km (25 sq miles)

Dundee

(dʌnˈdiː)
n
(Biography) 1st Viscount, title of John Graham of Claverhouse. ?1649–89, Scottish Jacobite leader, who died from his wounds after winning the battle of Killiecrankie
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Dun•dee

(dʌnˈdi, ˈdʌn di)

n.
a seaport in E Scotland, on the Firth of Tay. 175,748.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
It was in the dock in Dundee, where we had brought a full cargo of jute from Calcutta.
"'From Dundee,' I answered, glancing at the postmark.
"The first was from Pondicherry, the second from Dundee, and the third from London."
I have heard him say that he could see the Dundee people out, any day, and walk home afterwards without staggering; and yet the Dundee people have as strong heads and as strong punch, gentlemen, as you are likely to meet with, between the poles.
In 1883 he commanded the steam sealer SEA UNICORN, of Dundee. He had then had several successful voyages in succession, and in the following year, 1884, he retired.
I spent three days in wiring to Dundee, and at the end of that time I had ascertained the names of the crew of the SEA UNICORN in 1883.
Samuel Dundee had been the youngest of Margaret's four brothers, and, as Clara told me, she had well-nigh worshipped him.
"First of all, Samuel Dundee an' Agnes Hewitt; the next day Albert Mahan an' Minnie Duncan; an' by the week-end Eddie Troy and Flo Mackintosh--all sailor-men, an' un sux weeks' time the last of them back tull their ships an' awa', an' no one o' them dreamin' of the wuckedness they'd been ot."
Archie and Charlie, evidently great cronies, were pacing up and down, shoulder to shoulder, whistling "Bonnie Dundee"; Mac was reading in a corner, with his book close to his near-sighted eyes; Dandy was arranging his hair before the oval glass in the hat-stand; Geordie and Will investigating the internal economy of the moon-faced clock; and Jamie lay kicking up his heels on the mat at the foot of the stairs, bent on demanding his sweeties the instant Rose appeared.
He fled at once, and the minute it was well, "Up with the bonnets of bonnie Dundee," she slipped away to return no more till the young gentleman departed in high dudgeon.
Then the cavalry came up, to the beautiful cavalry canter of "Bonnie Dundee," and Vixen cocked her ear where she sat on the dog-cart.
Clephane of Dundee for Inspector Mackenzie of Scotland Yard.