Dunsany


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Dunsany

(dʌnˈseɪnɪ)
n
(Biography) 18th Baron, title of Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett. 1878–1957, Irish dramatist and short-story writer
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The Book of Wonder, by Lord Dunsany in 1912, is one in the collection, full of fantasy tales from "the edge of the world".
The Book of Wonder, by Lord Dunsany in 1912, is one in the collection, full of fanstasy tales from "the edge of the world".
Ger Lyons also extended an open invite for the comedian to visit his Glenburnie Stables in Dunsany, Co Meath.
(1) In this article, we propose to pick up on this discussion, relating this issue to questions about the nature of fantastic literature, and taking as our examples two stories by noted writers of the genre, Jorge Luis Borges, and a particular Anglo-Irish writer whom Borges greatly admired, Lord Dunsany (1878-1957).
Geneva Dunsany had blackmailed Jamie into sleeping with her just before she wed an older earl.
Eilmann's own monograph approaches Romanticism "from a decidedly German point of view" (13), although he does not completely discount the English Romantics, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Percy Bysshe Shelley (13), or their inheritors, Lord Dunsany and George MacDonald, among others, who served as English mediators of German Romanticism (14).
He will manage the equine interests of the Jones family at Killeen Glebe, a 200-acre farm near Dunsany, where Andy Lynch will continue to train for the family.
"The Ghost in the Corner And Other Stories," by Lord Dunsany, edited by S.T.
Lord Dunsany (Edward Plunkett, 1878-1957), an Irish writer and dramatist of fantasy and exotica, deplored the fact that in The Professor from Peking, "the land of Lady Precious Stream"--"this land of dragons, peach-trees, peonies, and plumblossoms, with its ages and ages of culture, slowly storing its dreams in green jade, porcelain, and gold"--"is complicated by telephones, bombs, and Communism" as a result of its getting to know, "unfortunately," too much of the West.
And so Yann bore us magnificently onwards, for he was elate with molten snow that the Poltiades had brought him from the Hills of Hap, and the Mam and Migris were swollen full with floods; and he bore us in his might past Kyph and Pir, and we saw the lights of Goolunza."--Lord Dunsany, "Idle Days on the Yann," 1912